headache

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Related to Head pain: migraine
  • noun

Synonyms for headache

Synonyms for headache

a duty or responsibility that is a source of anxiety, worry, or hardship

Synonyms for headache

something or someone that causes anxiety

pain in the head caused by dilation of cerebral arteries or muscle contractions or a reaction to drugs

References in periodicals archive ?
As well as eye and reflex checks, testing for tumours, Dr Dassan also took a full medical and drug history from them to review possible triggers for their head pain and reviewed whether their current treatments were working.
But Faye said the minute there are any problems with his shunt or if he suffers any head pain, photophobia or vomiting, he has to go to Alder Hey to be seen by a neurosurgeon.
The head pain, which can be characterised by its severity and position on one side of the head and near the eye, was first reported in medical literature in 2004, with several dozen more cases documented in the following years.
Half of the general population experience headache during any given year, and more than 90% report a lifetime history of head pain.
Most people who are having a lot of symptoms, say neck or head pain or immune problems, chronic fatigue or even arm and leg pains might have the Atlas slightly out of position.
Warning signal headaches that cannot be attributed to any known cause should be taken seriously if they consist of sudden, severe head pain; head pain following an injury to the head; fever accompanying head pain; head pain with mental confusion; headache problems that did not occur until middle age; and daily headaches.
The head pain of classic migraines may occur on one side of your head or on both sides.
Randall Road, ambulance needed for an elderly man with head pain.
The findings, published in the journal BMC Neurology, show that listening to one or two hours of music every day was linked to head pain.
The findings suggest that a lack of exercise may be a risk factor for developing non- migraine headaches and that exercise is a challenge for people already suffering from any form of head pain.
UNHAPPY: Rita Gibson has suffered with head pain ever since the incident at North Shields Co-Op in 2002
The chapter on head pain is, not altogether surprisingly, the longest by a narrow margin, but the author proves equally sound when discussing neck, thoracic, low back, abdominal and extremity pain, as well as the dreaded but not uncommon problem of total body pain.
He was still having severe head pain after the surgery.
Most of us are focused on the head pain, but when you talk to patients, many [of them] will say they are not disabled by the head pain as much as they are by some of the migraine-associated features such as nausea and vomiting.
If so, did he/she exhibit any of the following symptoms: head pain that interfered with daily activities, nausea or vomiting, sensitivity to light or sound, numbness or speech difficulty?