effect

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Related to Hawthorne effect: placebo effect, Hawthorne studies
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References in periodicals archive ?
THE SOURCE: "Was There Really a Hawthorne Effect at the Hawthorne Plant?
Its powerful opening gambit stated quite baldly that about 75% of the impact of medical or healthcare interventions was attributable to a combination of the placebo and the Hawthorne effects.
Using a comparison condition that involves putting advice just before the competition might control for the possibility of a Hawthorne effect as well as testing whether the self-instructions work because they include new information or because they focus the golfer's mind on what to do right before doing it.
The Hawthorne effect refers to a phenomenon where a study subject's behavior and/or study outcomes are altered as a result of the subject's awareness of being under observation.
Or, are the changes observed in students' attitudes and performance only temporary responses to changes in the immediate learning environment, the Hawthorne Effect (Diaper, 1990)?
The Hawthorne effect refers to the improvement subjects typically exhibit simply by being studied--their reactions to being "observed and cared for.
Remember the power of the Hawthorne effect when your staff or physicians moan, "Not another CHF study
The results of these experiments became known as the Hawthorne Effect, and popularized as the "Somebody Upstairs Cares" syndrome.
The Hawthorne effect cannot be eliminated completely.
They might also respond positively because of the Hawthorne Effect (Roethlisberger & Dickson, 1939).
Partner ratings by children paired in academic activities (C2) and those in the Hawthorne Effect control group (C3) did not change over the three test administration times.
One has to assume that we are merely seeing a Hawthorne effect on a population with much closer and better follow-up.