Harriet Wilson


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Synonyms for Harriet Wilson

author of the first novel by an African American that was published in the United States (1808-1870)

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References in periodicals archive ?
In striking contrast to women like Maria Stewart, Harriet Wilson and her Frado are "saved" not through religion but through speech itself.
As he and his coeditor did in their collaborative work on Harriet Wilson, Reginald Pitts mines newspapers, probate, census, marriage, pension, and death records, resurrecting and stringing together details that facilitate historically informed interpretations.
Our Nig and the She-Devil: New Information about Harriet Wilson and the 'Bellmont' Family.
All parenthesized references are to this edition: Harriet Wilson, Our Nig; Or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black.
Deeply rooted in archival research, Foreman's book focuses primarily on five authors--Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Wilson, Frances E.
I will later argue that Harriet Wilson, one particularly interesting writer of abolitionist children's literature, uses this performance to establish her authority in making her political argument.
But the challengers for the title are likely to include two teenagers from Heswall, Harriet Wilson, handicap five and Rachel Goodall, two.
The autobiographies of four 19th-century women, Sojourner Truth, Eliza Potter, Harriet Wilson and Elizabeth Keckley, reveal their shared pride and value for themselves as self-reliant wage laborers.
Fanny Fern and Harriet Wilson, writing in the more overtly rebellious period following the publication of The Declaration of Sentiments and at the height of the abolitionist fervor, were nevertheless confronted with the same challenge of hiding their anger behind a facade of womanly decorum.
Tatler's managing editor Harriet Wilson said stiffly: "We can do without this sort of publicity.
Harriet Jacobs and Harriet Wilson use the spectacle of their bodies in pain metonymically to refer to a more profound state of deprivation.
But in the final game Claire Fry and Harriet Wilson won 4&2 against Sheila McKinnon and Karen Schneider to ensure the match was halved.
Though this proposition may seem counter-intuitive, it is borne out by Peterson's analysis of the discursive strategies of those women whose works she analyzes: Sojourner Truth, Maria Stewart, Jarena Lee, Nancy Prince, Mary Ann Shadd Cary, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Sarah Parker Remond, Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Wilson, and Charlotte Forten.
In part two, "Founding Fictions of Liberty," Doyle brings together paradigmatic transatlantic literary texts by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Daniel Defoe, Susanna Rowson, William Hill Brown, Harriet Wilson, Olaudah Equiano, and Herman Melville.
Harriet Wilson of Heswall was runner-up in Kilbuirn Trophy for the U16s age group with 155.