Harold I

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Synonyms for Harold I

illegitimate son of Canute who seized the throne of England in 1037 (died in 1040)

References in classic literature ?
Who would have thought that Harold, within a few brief days, would himself possess no more of his kingdom, than the share which he allotted in his wrath to the Norwegian invader?
But you know Paris is so very amusing, and if only Harold remains good-natured about it, I shall be content to wait for the caravan (that's what he calls mamma and the children).
There are some very odd Americans here, who keep throwing Harold into fits of laughter.
Harold March had imagined many things about his meeting with the great political reformer, but he had never pictured him with a gun under his arm, drinking brandy in a public house.
It is clear that some time has elapsed since this Harold established these relations with the girl--some weeks, at any rate--since the brother in Greece has had time to hear of it and come across.
While there she had met a young man named Harold Latimer, who had acquired an ascendancy over he and had eventually persuaded her to fly with him.
Then, for heaven's sake, having Harold Skimpole, a confiding child, petitioning you, the world, an agglomeration of practical people of business habits, to let him live and admire the human family, do it somehow or other, like good souls, and suffer him to ride his rocking-horse
Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies
And does it seem to me that I am about to deprive Harold Skimpole of his share in such possessions, which are his only birthright
Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick was fair-hatred, blue-eyed, and slender, with a rosy, boyish face that might have been molded more by an environment of luxury, indolence, and ease than the more strenuous exigencies of life's sterner requirements.
The concentrated gaze of a hidden observer provokes a warning sensation of nervous unrest in such as these, but though twenty pairs of savage eyes were gazing fixedly at Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick, the fact aroused no responsive sensation of impending danger in his placid breast.
Here Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick saw a number of Negresses engaged in laying fagots around a stake and in preparing fires beneath a number of large cooking vessels.
These are a few verses from one of the best known parts of Childe Harold.
Like his own Childe Harold, "With pleasure drugg'd he almost long'd for woe.
And I'm going to dig it right into you wherever I think it will hurt most, unless you stop being Harold at once.