sage grouse

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  • noun

Synonyms for sage grouse

large grouse of sagebrush regions of North America

References in periodicals archive ?
Our objective was to estimate daily nest survival rates of Gunnison Sage-Grouse for the western portion of Colorado's Gunnison Basin subpopulation, and to assess the effects of local-and landscape-scale habitat characteristics on nest survival.
We captured adult and yearling female Gunnison Sage-Grouse during April and the first week of May near seven of 10 known active leks within the study area from 2000-2009 using spotlighting techniques (Giesen et al.
The landscape-scale spatial predictor variables that we used for our nest survival analysis were a subset of those previously developed for investigation of nest site habitat selection of Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Aldridge et al.
We also investigated the effect of proximity (Euclidian distance measured in km) to conifer/juniper classed habitat and water on the nest success of Gunnison Sage-Grouse.
Nest success for Gunnison Sage-Grouse for Kezar Basin, Sapinero Mesa, and other areas using this 38-day estimate, was 43% (SE = 10%), 46% (SE = 7%), and 83% (SE = 13%), respectively.
Like all grouse, Gunnison sage-grouse are generally shy, but when humans approach too closely, they explode out of the brush--a trait that's earned them the nickname "heart-attack bird.
They look like King Henry the Eighth, with their white breasts like the ermine collars of monarchs," says Leigh Robertson, coordinator of the San Miguel Basin Gunnison Sage-Grouse Working Group.
Because Gunnison sage-grouse are extraordinarily faithful to their leks (the clearings where annual courtship dances take place), they're reluctant to establish new sites when development destroys those mating grounds.
In southwest Colorado, the Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, area ranchers, county officials, and other local groups joined forces in 1995, more than a decade before the Gunnison sage-grouse became a candidate for the endangered species list.
The Park Service, meanwhile, just concluded a 12-year research project that fitted radio collars on Gunnison sage-grouse and followed them throughout the year.
Additional information exists in the form of museum specimens, personal communications with ranchers and wildlife managers, and field work specifically searching for evidence of sage-grouse that can be used to refine the historical distribution of Gunnison Sage-Grouse in Colorado.
We also examined historic journals describing some of the first documented reports of flora and fauna in areas possibly occupied by Gunnison Sage-Grouse in the 1800s.
These areas were open (except Mesa County) to hunting of sage-grouse and data (observations and wing collections) were available precluding the presence of Gunnison Sage-Grouse.
This is ~35 km northeast of the present population of Gunnison Sage-Grouse at Poncha Pass in Saguache County.
The Lyon/Mono population is genetically more diverse and distinct than the Gunnison Sage-Grouse species (Kahn et al.