gregarine

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Related to Gregarines: Gregarinia, Gregarinasina
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  • noun

Words related to gregarine

vermiform protozoans parasitic in insects and other invertebrates

References in periodicals archive ?
Gregarine and coccidian protozoans (Apicomplexa) found leading to hypertrophy of the digestive epithelial cells and nephridal tubules, respectively, were recorded only in the Mar del Plata population, both with a low prevalence and intensity of infection (Table 2).
a new septate gregarine from cultured penaeoid shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone), in Ecuador.
Paraophioidina scolescoides NSP, a new aseptate gregarine from cultured Pacific White shrimp Penaeus vannamei.
Smiley (University of Fairbanks, Alaska) for information on gregarines, M.
Because of the numerical dominance of the gregarines in oysters, a modified total parasite body burden was also calculated as the sum of the quantitative counts of the remaining parasite groups.
Because of the numerical dominance of the gregarines in oyster taxa, a modified total parasite body burden was also calculated as the sum of the quantitative counts of the remaining parasite groups.
It was reported that gregarines of the genus Nematopsis cause focal hemocytic infiltration at most, without obvious pathogenic effects (Bower et al.
Gregarines del genere Nematopsis (Apicomplexa: Porosporidae) in Molluschi bivalvi del mare Adriatico.
Gregarines of the genus Nematopsis use marine bivalves as normal intermediate hosts, completing their life cycle in the gut of marine arthropods, and are usually associated with a focal hemocyte infiltration, without measurable effects on host health (Lauckner 1983).
Three new species of gregarines (Apicomplexa: Sporozoea: Porosporidae) in the estuarine crab from Kerala, India.
Excluding the numerically-dominant gregarines, however, removed the differential between oysters and mytilids, with the exception of East-coast mytilids that were more frequently parasitized than East-coast oysters.
In addition, Cremonte and Figueras (2003) reported, for the first time for this species, coccidian and gregarines in a sample of yellow clam from Isla del Jabali, which was taken 2 years before the mass mortality.
One popular alternative hypothesis for the pattern of invasion and decline is apparent competition via the gregarine protozoan parasite Ascogregarina taiwanensis (Blackmore et al.
The gregarine protozoan Nematopsis was found at all 10 sites (prevalence 24% to 90%) and oysters at some sites had concurrent infections of Nematopsis prytherchi and Nematopsis ostrearum in connective tissue near the stomach, mantle, and gills.