Greco-Roman

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Related to Greco-Roman culture: Graeco-Roman
  • adj

Synonyms for Greco-Roman

of or pertaining to or characteristic of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures

References in periodicals archive ?
Those who circumcised their sons and rejected nudity in gymnasia/baths had to construct an identity visibly separate from "civilized" Greco-Roman culture and its symbols.
This is a book written for scholars, and can be read with appreciation especially by those intrigued by the interconnections between early Christian literature and Greco-Roman culture.
FOR JEWS, THE STRUGGLE to maintain identity amidst the forces of Greco-Roman culture was largely one internal to the Jewish community.
He believed that just as the Christian religion, when it spread beyond the confines of Palestine and came face to face with the Greco-Roman culture, gave birth to theologians who established a synthesis between Greek thought and the Christian faith, there was a need in India for a fresh synthesis between the non-dualist form of Indian philosophical and religious thought and Catholic thought.
But Egypt interposes - you can't get into the central and western European section, or to Greco-Roman culture, from Africa without going through Egypt.
Stoicism was the regnant philosophy of the Greco-Roman culture at the time of the NT's compilation.
Greco-Roman culture and the New Testament; studies commemorating the centennial of the Pontifical Biblical Institute.
Nonetheless, he proceeds to assert that arsenokoites had a more specific meaning in Greco-Roman culture than we can be aware of and that "it seems to have referred to some kind of economic exploitation by means of sex, perhaps but not necessarily homosexual sex.
Libanius of Antioch, one of the most significant Greek authors of the 4th century, would have been surprised to learn that his Greco-Roman culture was a mere veneer hiding his true eastern identity.
This collection of twenty eight articles on interpreting Greco-Roman culture presents a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to examining Greek mythology within the broader context of the intellectual and cultural development of the ancient world and provides an in depth discussion of the influence of traditional stories on the development of a shared historical culture.
The question itself is reasonable enough, for Greco-Roman culture did practice literary mimesis: imitation of classical exempla was fundamental to Hellenistic education, and if there is a New Testament writing where dependence on Homer would most likely be found, it would surely be in the second volume of Luke-Acts.
The question itself is reasonable enough, for Greco-Roman culture did practice literary mimesis: imitation of classical exempla was fundamental to Hellenistic education, and if there is a New Testament writing where dependence on Homer would most likely be found, it would surely be in the second volume of Luke-Acts, where the author, largely free of the constraints of prior gospel compositions, was able to shape his narrative according to whatever models lay to hand.
summarizes some of the theoretical and practical approaches to love that have arisen in Western culture from early reflections in Greco-Roman culture to the present.
The first five chapters treat banquets as a central institution of Greco-Roman culture.
Emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture and other cultures and religions.