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  • noun

Words related to grange

an outlying farm

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References in classic literature ?
They have filled some flour sacks with clean dry moss from the woods, and put half a dozen blankets on the top, and they hope you can get along until the messenger who starts to-night for La Grange can bring some bedding over.
But the hired men--the superintendent and his workmen--were the only ones who ever got anything out of your last experience with Colonel Waters at La Grange, and--and we at least lived among civilized people there.
A scramble of things bought at La Grange, without reference to size or style.
Rivers and Hannah repaired to the parsonage: and so the old grange was abandoned.
Go to the Grange to-morrow, and stay there a week in Miss Brock's society.
However, if you prefer my passing a week at the Grange to my passing it here, to the Grange I will go.
Sir Knight,'' replied Rowena, ``the grange which you contemn hath been my shelter from infancy; and, trust me, when I leave it should that day ever arrive it shall be with one who has not learnt to despise the dwelling and manners in which I have been brought up.
Yet the scene in the dining-room of the Abbey Grange was sufficiently strange to arrest his attention and to recall his waning interest.
Every now and then, by an effort, he would throw off the impression, and talk as if the matter were clear, but then his doubts would settle down upon him again, and his knitted brows and abstracted eyes would show that his thoughts had gone back once more to the great dining-room of the Abbey Grange, in which this midnight tragedy had been enacted.
The household at the Abbey Grange were much surprised at our return, but Sherlock Holmes, finding that Stanley Hopkins had gone off to report to headquarters, took possession of the dining-room, locked the door upon the inside, and devoted himself for two hours to one of those minute and laborious investigations which form the solid basis on which his brilliant edifices of deduction were reared.
She was open, ardent, and not in the least self-admiring; indeed, it was pretty to see how her imagination adorned her sister Celia with attractions altogether superior to her own, and if any gentleman appeared to come to the Grange from some other motive than that of seeing Mr.
Sir James Chettam was going to dine at the Grange to-day with another gentleman whom the girls had never seen, and about whom Dorothea felt some venerating expectation.
And it was the Plutocracy, through its secret agents of course, that encouraged the Grange Party and even spread it to the cities into the ranks of the dying middle class.
That was the Grange, remarked Albert, over his shoulder, and then he jammed the brake on, and the motor slowed down and stopped.
He looked enviously at the Grange, whose windows poured light and laughter.