Gouverneur Morris


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Synonyms for Gouverneur Morris

United States statesman who led the committee that produced the final draft of the United States Constitution (1752-1816)

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References in periodicals archive ?
And indeed, Washington was capable of lasting friendship even with the cosmopolitan Gouverneur Morris, a man twenty years his junior with no military background and who sported something close to the opposite of Washington's reserved behavior.
IN THE LAST DECADE, HOWEVER, A SMALL but impressive body of books has sought to rehabilitate him, among them, William Howard Adams's Gouverneur Morris: An Independent L/re (2003); Richard Brookhiser's Gentleman Revolutionary: Gouverneur Morris, the Rake Who Wrote the Constitution (2003); and Melanie Randolph Miller's Envoy to the Terror: Gouverneur Morris and the French Revolution (2005).
Entry for July 13, 1804, in 2 THE DIARY AND LETTERS OF GOUVERNEUR MORRIS, MINISTER OF THE UNITED STATES TO FRANCE; MEMBER OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 456, 456 (Anne Cary Morris ed.
James Wilson's answer to Gouverneur Morris suggests that the delegates intended the Exceptions Clause to empower Congress to limit the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction over substantive issues of law, common and civil, as well as to empower Congress to withdraw from the court the power to disturb jury verdicts.
In that lawyers are trained in the arts of draftsmanship, negotiation, and compromise, it is not surprising that the most powerful founding fathers tended to be lawyers, including Gouverneur Morris, James Wilson, and John Rutledge.
Franklin's and Washington's presence gave the group both dignity and gravitas, but it was Madison and James Wilson and Gouverneur Morris of Pennsylvania who provided much of the intellectual leadership.
George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, and others have all appeared as the subjects of recent biographical studies, while works such as Joseph Ellis's Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation have sought to examine the interaction of these figures in the birth of the nation.
Gentleman Revolutionary: Gouverneur Morris, the Rake Who Wrote the Constitution, by Richard Brookhiser New York: Free Press, 221 pages, $26
GOUVERNEUR MORRIS is one of the unsung heroes of the American Revolution, although he was neither wholly general, orator, nor political philosopher.
The two best-known stories about Gouverneur Morris are probably not true, alas.
In Gentleman Revolutionary, Richard Brookhiser, who has written the biographies of several other founding fathers, has produced a life of Gouverneur Morris, a little-regarded founder of whom most Americans have probably never heard, yet who, in a sense, personified both strains of thought.
But New York diplomat Gouverneur Morris refused to give up the ghost, and did what he could to keep the notion of an east-west water link alive.
As the story goes, Gouverneur Morris of New York asserted that he could be as familiar with General Washington as with any other intimate acquaintance.
1) Some, like Gouverneur Morris of Pennsylvania, argued against impeachment: "Besides, who Is to impeach?
Gouverneur Morris of Pennsylvania opposed giving Congress the power to emit bills of credit, and he moved to strike the phrase authorizing it.