Gospel According to Matthew

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Related to Gospel of Matthew: Gospel of Mark
  • noun

Synonyms for Gospel According to Matthew

one of the Gospels in the New Testament

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In addition, it is maintained that in the previous studies some sources have received but little attention, if any, like, for example, the Gospel of Matthew (Mt 1880) as well as the literary sources published between the two World Wars and after World War II (p.
Anti-Paulinisms and Intertextuality in the Gospel of Matthew," in Unity and Diversity in the Gospels and Paul: Essays in Honor of Frank J.
Justin Martyr indicates in Dialogue with Trypho 48 that there were Christians even in his day who did not accept the pesher found in the Greek translation of the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew, produced, as Jerome tells us (Lives of Illustrious Men 3), by an unknown translator: "For there are some of our race, my friends, who admit that he is the Anointed One, while holding him to be man of men .
Since it premiered at the Brighton Festival in 2002, The Gospel of Matthew has been seen more than 100 times in the UK, including three runs in Edinburgh and appearances at the Greenbelt, Soul In The City and Pentecost festivals.
search=Matthew+15&version=NIV) Gospel of Matthew where a Canaanite woman was rewarded for her faith in God.
The new Isaac; tradition and intertextuality in the gospel of Matthew.
There is nothing in the Gospel of Matthew that rules out the apostle Matthew as its author, and there is nothing in the life of the early church that compelled it to select the apostle Matthew" (4).
Bible numbers expert and author, JW Farquhar, validates this interpretation mathematically with the 77 77 77 natural descending genealogy of the Son of Man in the Gospel of Matthew, the 77 ascending genealogy of the Son of God in the Gospel of Luke that leads back up to God, and then again and again with many more 77 biblical references to Jesus.
In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus tells his disciples to "teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things, whatsoever I have commanded you" (Matthew 28:19-20).
The latter period occurred during "the years when Pontius Pilate was procurator of Judea and when the earthquake of the Gospel of Matthew is historically constrained," Williams said.
By this measure, Professor Herbert Basser's The Mind Behind the Gospels is at first glance presented as another textfocused commentary on the first half of the Gospel of Matthew.
Because this poem is based on a passage from the gospel of Matthew, however, we are also asked to reflect on how little humanity has changed in the last 2,000 years.
Reflections on the Gospel of Matthew" is a guide for gaining a greater grasp and understanding of the scripture, primarily the gospel of Matthew.
The Gospel of Matthew: Torah for the Church" discusses the Gospel of Matthew, which the author describes as the most profoundly Jewish book of the New Testament.
We meet a comical Jesus, in the Gospel of Matthew, who addresses this issue.