Goodman


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Related to Goodman: Amana
  • noun

Synonyms for Goodman

United States clarinetist who in 1934 formed a big band (including black as well as white musicians) and introduced a kind of jazz known as swing (1909-1986)

References in classic literature ?
As nearly as could be discerned, the second traveller was about fifty years old, apparently in the same rank of life as Goodman Brown, and bearing a considerable resemblance to him, though perhaps more in expression than features.
Come, Goodman Brown," cried his fellow-traveller, "this is a dull pace for the beginning of a journey.
exclaimed the goodman, unconsciously resuming his walk.
If it be as thou sayest," replied Goodman Brown, "I marvel they never spoke of these matters; or, verily, I marvel not, seeing that the least rumor of the sort would have driven them from New England.
cried Goodman Brown, with a stare of amazement at his undisturbed companion.
shouted he again and again; then composing himself, "Well, go on, Goodman Brown, go on; but, prithee, don't kill me with laughing.
Well, then, to end the matter at once," said Goodman Brown, considerably nettled, "there is my wife, Faith.
Nay, if that be the case," answered the other, "e'en go thy ways, Goodman Brown.
As he spoke he pointed his staff at a female figure on the path, in whom Goodman Brown recognized a very pious and exemplary dame, who had taught him his catechism in youth, and was still his moral and spiritual adviser, jointly with the minister and Deacon Gookin.
Yea, truly is it, and in the very image of my old gossip, Goodman Brown, the grandfather of the silly fellow that now is.
Mingled with fine wheat and the fat of a new-born babe," said the shape of old Goodman Brown.
Of this fact, however, Goodman Brown could not take cognizance.
Thus the pair proceeded, at a good free pace, until suddenly, in a gloomy hollow of the road, Goodman Brown sat himself down on the stump of a tree and refused to go any farther.
Amidst these pleasant and praiseworthy meditations, Goodman Brown heard the tramp of horses along the road, and deemed it advisable to conceal himself within the verge of the forest, conscious of the guilty purpose that had brought him thither, though now so happily turned from it.
Goodman Brown alternately crouched and stood on tiptoe, pulling aside the branches and thrusting forth his head as far as he durst without discerning so much as a shadow.