Golden Horde


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Related to Golden Horde: Genghis Khan
  • noun

Words related to Golden Horde

a Mongolian army that swept over eastern Europe in the 13th century

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References in periodicals archive ?
The work is organized around a single, short narrative that recounts the conversion of Ozbek Khan of the Golden Horde (r.
Al-Hakim, however, was hauled out of relative obscurity in order to play a role in the budding relations between Baybars and Berke, ruler of the Golden Horde, who was also a convert to Islam.
There was no threat to counter, as the Golden Horde and the Central Asian Mongols were distracted or exhausted, and Ghazan's forces were able to return to Syria in both 1300-1 and 1302-3.
It contains evidence of the medieval city of Bolgar, an early settlement of the civilisation of Volga-Bolgars, which existed between the 7th and 15th centuries, and was the first capital of the Golden Horde in the 13th century.
It was conquered by the Mongols in the thirteenth century, and after the collapse of the Golden Horde it became a khanate (at first independent, after an Ottoman vassal) that served as a continual threat to the Eastern Slavs who attempted to cultivate the fertile steppe to its north.
Are we right to think that horse-riding may have arisen in Central Asia or was it just that Genghis Khan and his Golden Horde made such a speciality of it?
This building somehow survived the attack of Batu Khan and his Golden Horde in the 13th century.
This may contain a bronze, silver or golden horde of treasure comprising Dremel products and other goodies, including a cheque for 2,500 euros - pounds 2,000 - to spend on travel.
The only game played in Division Two, meanwhile, saw Golden Horde beat Norton Arms 3-0.
The only game in Division One saw Abacus overcome Turf & Feather 3-0, and in Division Two, Grange Red Lion kept the pressure on the leaders with a 2-1 win over third placed Golden Horde.
The Shumaevo kurgans proved to belong to three main periods of construction: the Early Bronze Age (fourth-third millennium BC), the Early Iron Age (eighth century BC to fourth century AD) and the Middle Ages, the time of the Mongols and the Golden Horde (thirteenth-fourteenth centuries AD) (Table 1).
In under 200 pages, Vasary gives the reader a taste of many things--the politics of the Assenid dynasty of the Second Bulgarian Empire, the rise of Nogay within the western lands of the Golden Horde, the involvement of Cuman and Mongol troops in military events in Serbia and Byzantium, and the beginnings of the medieval Romanian states--but no single overarching framework to tie them all together.
Despite the fact that the principalities represented the true Orthodox faith, God had produced the Golden Horde as punishment for Russian sins.
His second dam is Grade 1 Monmouth Oaks heroine Golden Horde.