Golden Fleece


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Golden Fleece: Jason and the Golden Fleece
  • noun

Words related to Golden Fleece

in Greek mythology, a fleece of gold owned by the king of Colchis and guarded in a sacred grove by a dragon

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
There was no possibility of making any resistance; and the fifty heroic Argonauts might all have been killed or wounded by a flock of troublesome birds, without ever setting eyes on the Golden Fleece, if Jason had not thought of asking the advice of the oaken image.
Since that time, Phrixus had married the king's daughter; and the two young princes had been born and brought up at Colchis, and had spent their play-days in the outskirts of the grove, in the center of which the Golden Fleece was hanging upon a tree.
At the same time, however, they spoke as if it were very doubtful whether Jason would succeed in getting the Golden Fleece.
At all events, turn back who may, I will never see Greece again, unless I carry with me the Golden Fleece.
King Pelias, who sits on my father's throne (to which he has no more right than to the one on which your excellent majesty is now seated), has engaged to come down from it, and to give me his crown and sceptre, provided I bring him the Golden Fleece.
If you will trust to me, I can instruct you how to tame the fiery bulls, and sow the dragon's teeth, and get the Golden Fleece.
If Jason had been capable of fearing anything, he would have been afraid of making this young princess his enemy; for, beautiful as she now looked, she might, the very next instant, become as terrible as the dragon that kept watch over the Golden Fleece.
My father and all his court delight in nothing so much as to see a stranger trying to yoke them, in order to come at the Golden Fleece.
And, to tell you the truth, princess, the Golden Fleece does not appear so well worth the winning, after what I have here beheld
True, the Golden Fleece may not be so valuable as you have thought it; but then there is nothing better in the world; and one must needs have an object, you know.
And now I solicit your majesty's permission to encounter the dragon, that I may take down the Golden Fleece from the tree, and depart, with my nine and forty comrades.
I forbid you, on pain of death, to make any more attempts to get the Golden Fleece.
He could think of nothing better to be done than to summon together his forty-nine brave Argonauts, march at once to the Grove of Mars, slay the dragon, take possession of the Golden Fleece, get on board the Argo, and spread all sail for Iolchos.
Will he give you the Golden Fleece, without any further risk or trouble?
And he forbids me to make any more attempts, and positively refuses to give up the Golden Fleece, whether I slay the dragon or no.