glucagon

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  • noun

Words related to glucagon

a hormone secreted by the pancreas

References in periodicals archive ?
Our research found that the HC diet enhanced secretion of insulin and glucagons in nonlacting goats compared with HF diet (Table 6).
On the basis of present study on nonlactating goats it was concluded that HC diet would increase plasma glucose concentration and arterial flow accompanied by NEFA and BOHB concentrations and NEFA portal flow and BOHB hepatic flow decreased associated with a tendency for increased glucagons hepatic concentration compared with HF diet.
In addition the hormones especially insulin and glucagon play the major role of regulating intermediary metabolisms such that normal blood glucose concentration is maintained.
Interestingly, GLP-1 and GIP [glucose-dependent insulino-tropic peptide] not only have an effect on insulin, but they also affect glucagon as well," Dr.
The results of our studies indicated that infusion of galanin into the third ventricle may increase the plasma levels of GH, glucagons, fatty acid and urea, and decrease the plasma levels of T3, T4, insulin and glucose in goats undergoing severe body loss.
Samples were assayed for plasma T3, T4, GH, insulin and glucagon concentrations by double-antibody RIA.
Located in the pancreas, they produce glucagon, a hormone released during fasting, to tell the liver to make glucose for use by the brain.
Thus glucagon and insulin are part of a feedback system designed to keep blood glucose at a stable level.
In 1983, Bell et al (18) identified the second incretin GLP-1, a peptide of 30 amino acids derived from the glucagon precursor proglucagon.
Fourth, in addition to its insulinotropic action, GLP-1 inhibits glucagon release, delays gastric emptying, and may promote early satiety (see below).
Thus, although most studies on the developmental effects of CPF are appropriately directed toward neurotoxicity, the present work instead takes a similar approach with regard to cell signaling in the liver and heart, concentrating on the cAMP cascade and its responses to some of the major inputs that control that pathway, [beta]-adrenoceptors ([beta]ARs), and glucagon receptors (Figure 1).
s])-coupled receptors, the [beta]AR, and glucagon receptor, using 100 [micro]M isoproterenol or 3 [micro]M glucagon, respectively.