climate

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  • noun

Synonyms for climate

Synonyms for climate

the totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development

a prevailing quality, as of thought, behavior, or attitude

Synonyms for climate

the weather in some location averaged over some long period of time

Synonyms

the prevailing psychological state

Synonyms

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References in periodicals archive ?
We believe this tendency for increased global temperatures is related to human activity,'' specifically the gas emissions, Thomas Karl, senior scientist at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.
Washington , Oct 21 (ANI): A new study has found that driving a car increases global temperatures in the long run more than making the same long-distance journey by air.
Unfortunately from that year the global temperature has not increased, wobbling randomly by less than 0.
The gradual rise in global temperatures over the past few decades has been leaving its mark on wine.
The scientists at Queen Mary, University of London said the predicted rise in global temperature of 4 degrees Celsius by 2100 would reduce absorption by 13 percent.
Since 1980, global temperature has risen significantly.
There's substantial year-to-year variability of global temperature caused by the tropical El Nino-La Nina cycle.
He asks me to explain why there has been little correlation between the regular rise in carbon dioxide concentrations and global temperature for almost ten years.
Expected increases in global temperature could eradicate from a sixth to a half of the plant and animal species across large areas of the globe, scientists say.
Climate sensitivity-the mean global temperature response to a doubling of the concentration of atmospheric CO2-is estimated to be 1.
Although annual global temperature remained below the very high 1998 level up until 2005, this is part of a normal fluctuation.
Results of many computerized climate models suggest that continuation of the current increase in average global temperature will boost evaporation from the oceans.
The team used a combination of global climate models and historical climate data to show that there is a simple linear relationship between total cumulative emissions and global temperature change.
THE HEAT IS ON In the past century, the average global temperature has risen about 0.
The unique ecosystem may document a short spike in global temperature lasting less than 100,000 years, says Hickey.
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