Gestapo


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Related to Gestapo: Concentration camps
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  • noun

Words related to Gestapo

the secret state police in Nazi Germany

References in periodicals archive ?
Meyer is convinced that the Association functionaries operated out of real concern for German Jews and that they cooperated with the Gestapo in the hope of trying to reduce hardship and suffering, and possibly influence events and conditions.
BRUTAL SADIST Evil Heinrich Mueller, who led Gestapo
Yeo-Thomas faced the same peril - trapped on a train with SS troops and the Gestapo officer Barbie - the 'Butcher of Lyon' - who had recently murdered one of Yeo-Thomas's colleagues Jean Moulin.
An Archives insider said: "He was one of the cleverest agents the Gestapo ever had.
Two months after the Amiens attack, his squadrons took out the Gestapo-held Dutch central population registry as well as the Gestapo headquarters in the Danish University of Aarhus in other precision raids.
He was captured in France by the Gestapo in 1943 after a betrayal which is still the subject of controversy.
Moreover, she discussed the inconsistencies in the bill, and particularly the difficulty in making teachers, health care providers, and others to become a new age Gestapo.
The power-hungry Himmier gained control over the political police in all German regions, including the Gestapo (Geheime Staatspolizei, or Secret State Police).
In the other panel the figure of Masha Bruskina, a real-life victim of the Gestapo whose image we've encountered in Spero's earlier work, is shown wearing a big sign written in German and Russian that declares the crime for which she must die.
He is especially jarring on his first appearance early in the movie, in a Gestapo uniform, because of both the characteristics associated with him as a media personage and those he shows in the film.
Archival sources including reports of rural police, county prefects, Nazi party members, Gestapo officials, field security agents, and analysts of Heydrich's Sicherheitsdienst (SD) or Security Service repeatedly document clerical influence and its impact on Nazi racial policy in the Catholic countryside.
But at about that time the identity of the Mossad agent who had captured the fugitive Gestapo chief Adolf Eichmann in 1960 was finally released: His name was Peter Z.
Other files include those on Gestapo chief Heinrich Mueller, SS officer Klaus Barbie and medical experimenter Dr Josef Mengele.
He was deputy to the Gestapo "technician of death" Adolf Eichmann.
Far away from the threat of the Gestapo, they had the freedom to rally against Hitler, pursue their literary endeavors without fear of imprisonment, and launch campaigns to save their colleagues and loved ones still trapped in Europe.