References in periodicals archive ?
Easy geraniums to start you off are the pink spreader Geranium endressii Wargrave Pink (pictured), Geranium wallichianum Buxton's Variety, which has white-edged, china-blue flowers and beautifully mottled leaves, Geranium sanguineum, the bloody cranesbill, which actually has magenta flowers, and the striking blue, 60cm tall, Johnson's Blue.
Geranium sanguineum Glenluce is still one of the best forms of this smashing plant.
Last year, on one programme for Gardeners' World, we visited Walney Island off the Cumbrian coast and saw Geranium sanguineum striatum on the dunes.
The dwarf types that produce neat mats of foliage, such as Ballerina and Geranium sanguineum, known as the Bloody Cranesbill, are a good choice for rock gardens.
Geranium Sanguineum In the wild, bloody cranesbill GERANIUM SANGUINEUM In the wild, bloody cranesbill frequents areas with light, sandy soil, and its knobbly roots run just under the surface.
Short cranesbills, such as forms of Geranium sanguineum, are ideal, 'Album' being the best because its stems are more wiry than the others and offer better scaffolding.
If you are looking for ground cover or edging, Geranium sanguineum - the bloody cranesbill - fits the bill.