generation

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  • noun

Synonyms for generation

Synonyms for generation

all the people living at the same time or of approximately the same age

group of genetically related organisms constituting a single step in the line of descent

the normal time between successive generations

a stage of technological development or innovation

Related Words

a coming into being

Synonyms

Related Words

the production of heat or electricity

Related Words

the act of producing offspring or multiplying by such production

References in classic literature ?
Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
A writer of story books What kind of business in life -- what mode of glorifying God, or being serviceable to mankind in his day and generation -- may that be?
the place that I and my fathers have held for four generations by virtue of the axe.
They illustrate the fact that Nature, even when perverted by generations of famine fever, ignores the distinctions we set up between men.
The two gentlemen, who conducted me to the island, were pressed by their private affairs to return in three days, which I employed in seeing some of the modern dead, who had made the greatest figure, for two or three hundred years past, in our own and other countries of Europe; and having been always a great admirer of old illustrious families, I desired the governor would call up a dozen or two of kings, with their ancestors in order for eight or nine generations.
In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger; I do not shrink from this responsibility.
Such a birth requires, as its antecedents, not only a series of carefully arranged intermarriages, but also a long, continued exercise of frugality and self-control on the part of the would-be ancestors of the coming Equilateral, and a patient, systematic, and continuous development of the Isosceles intellect through many generations.
When the American enters on the history of his ancestors, he is driven, after some ten or twelve generations at most, to seek refuge in a country in Europe; whereas exactly the reverse is the case with us, our most remote extraction being American, while our more recent construction and education have taken place in Europe.
He looks upon it as a man may look at a vast nursery in an old, old mansion where innumerable generations of his own people have learned to walk.
As no other children have been born to any of the newer generations in the intervening years, all hopes of heritage are now centred in the grandson of this man.
Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as "historical" in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer "wonder tales" in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale.
The man who wrote that word upon the wall disappeared from the midst of the generations of man many centuries ago; the word, in its turn, has been effaced from the wall of the church; the church will, perhaps, itself soon disappear from the face of the earth.
And as soon as silence came, I found myself in front of this extraordinary mass of faces, thinking not of them, but of that long and unhappy chapter in our country's history which followed the one great structural mistake of the Fathers of the Republic; thinking of the one continuous great problem that generations of statesmen had wrangled over, and a million men fought about, and that had so dwarfed the mass of English men in the Southern States as to hold them back a hundred years behind their fellows in every other part of the world--in England, in Australia, and in the Northern and Western States; I was thinking of this dark shadow that had oppressed every large-minded statesman from Jefferson to Lincoln.
Many generations must have passed away before the descendants of the horde migrated south, or remained and adapted themselves to the changed conditions.
Generation by generation, down all the generations, had this fear of the Wild been stamped into their natures.
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