gender role

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Related to Gender stereotype: Gender roles
  • noun

Words related to gender role

the overt expression of attitudes that indicate to others the degree of your maleness or femaleness

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References in periodicals archive ?
Results indicate that in isolation both the gender stereotype and the individuating information condition initial predictions.
Entity beliefs and gender stereotypes have been linked to the level of pursuit of maths-intensive fields (Nosak et al.
Specifically, empirical evidence indicates that men and women react differently, and in opposite directions, to gender stereotype activation (Kray and Thompson, 2004).
vegetarianism--is rooted in a gender stereotype about manliness.
4) Of these explanations, the most convincing have been science-based, relying on the powerful role of implicit gender stereotypes.
It can be tempting to mix the gender stereotype issue with the question of general attractiveness, which misses the point, several experts say.
Because of this case, plaintiff attorneys will be able to argue that discrimination or harassment motivated by hostility to variance from gender stereotypes violates sex discrimination statutes," said Kathleen Phair Barnard, a Seattle attorney who represented plaintiff Antonio Sanchez.
In Pakistan, the most common stereotypes are ethnic, caste and gender stereotypes.
The Social Development Ministry finds it necessary to conduct communication campaign to change gender stereotypes in Kyrgyz society, the Minister stated.
Gender stereotypes when it comes to play and toys have a clear impact on youngsters' subject choices and career prospects.
Despite decades of struggle for women's right to equality, judicial processes worldwide are often shot through with harmful gender stereotypes, and this can amount to a denial of a woman's right to justice by the very legal system that is supposed to protect fundamental human rights for everyone.
The seven essays in this volume investigate how gender impacts development and socialization, looking at gender in parent-child relationships, gendered peer interactions, cyberbullying, whether having an older sister or brother is related to younger siblings' gender typing, the relationship between gender and pro-social behavior and judgments, how gender stereotypes and attitudes affect self-definition, and children's cognition about the gendered roles of occupations and parental roles in the home.
HALF of state-funded schools in the North East are paying too little attention to the way gender stereotypes influence subject choices, researchers have claimed.