gat

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References in periodicals archive ?
Before looking at the provisions of the NAFTA and GATS, it is essential to understand the fundamental nature of Canada's health care system.
GATS is an especially dangerous agreement because it is not a single fixed document; it is an open-ended, ongoing process that commits the U.
A There is a heightened awareness of the GATS and its importance within governments in developing countries but they need assistance to understand how to solicit input from businesses, especially if the associations are not aware of the importance of the GATS process.
Finally, one of the most important aspects of the GATS that applies to all signatories is the progressive liberalization provision in Article XIX.
While associations like the CME believe that Canada should take a strong lead in the GATS negotiations, there are a number of Canadian organizations that have voiced their opposition to Canada's involvement.
Under GATS, the distribution of a good also counts as a service, because the distribution is a service.
The GATS allows members to modify or withdraw commitments, provided that they negotiate offsetting compensation so that the overall level of its market access remains the same.
To bring this new, fun and unique set of dominoes to market, GATS Games needs support and backing.
Brown was critical of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade's (MFAT) "impossible" time frame for public consultation over GATS, an international treaty aimed a liberalising trade in services.
Those who caricature the GATS process with misleading information are no friends of the Third World.
Most service exporters and associations are also unfamiliar with the GATS and its schedules--or lists of liberalization commitments--and are therefore not necessarily able to provide useful input for trade negotiators.
For many developing countries, the process of negotiating commitments and rules regarding GATS is fraught with difficulties.
of Western Ontario) outline the general requirements of the GATS agreement and identify areas where public libraries may be susceptible to legal challenges from private service providers.
The guide, written by Auckland University professor Jane Kelsey, launched in January, warns any GATS commitments by the New Zealand Government could have a "significant impact on domestic health policy and regulation, including provision of primary and secondary health care, access to subsidies, licensing and professional qualifications".