care

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Synonyms for care

Synonyms for care

a cause of distress or anxiety

careful forethought to avoid harm or risk

the function of watching, guarding, or overseeing

the systematic application of remedies to effect a cure

to have an objection

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care for: to have the care and supervision of

Synonyms for care

judiciousness in avoiding harm or danger

an anxious feeling

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a cause for feeling concern

attention and management implying responsibility for safety

prefer or wish to do something

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be concerned with

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References in periodicals archive ?
Three participants specifically addressed the issue of maintaining futile care in their narratives.
Nurses with more experience are less affected by futile care.
With the norm of patient autonomy came demands for futile care, which have led to "the erosion of the professional stature of medicine.
Physicians must be persuaded to forego futile care, and often that is a difficult task.
These are daunting issues for any physician, but the infinite human and economics costs of futile care compel attention.
Indeed, under futile care theory, as under the NHS rationing approach, whether a seriously ill or disabled patient's request to be kept alive is granted depends on whether doctors and bioethicists see the patient's life as worth living and spending medical resources to sustain.
Expansive sex education for students, mandatory Texas Futile Care Law education for the elderly, and bipolar screening for high school students are just a few of the initiatives Aguado seeks to implement.
Resource Consumption and the Extent of Futile Care among Patients in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Setting," Pediatrics 128 (1996): 742-7.
But "physiological futility" of this sort is not the essence of contemporary futile care theory.
In the debate over providing futile care for a terminally ill patient who requests it, the value of autonomy conflicts with the value of social justice.
These are the core questions with which hospitals grapple when they consider nonbeneficial treatment -- a term many prefer to futile care.
Indeed, while it may not yet be "existing policy" everywhere, many hospitals around the country have adopted futile care protocols that create administrative processes for doing just that.
We are commonly faced with counseling the families of critically ill children on the issues surrounding futile care and the limitation or withdrawal of technological support, or with seeking permission for organ donation from parents of patients who die.
Little noticed by the mainstream media, Futile Care Theory is already being implemented in hospitals and nursing homes, both informally in clinical settings and formally through hospital protocols.
Second, evidence is beginning to accumulate that cutting futile care offers no great savings.