tornado

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Synonyms for tornado

Synonyms for tornado

a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground

a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted

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References in periodicals archive ?
The area is not particularly warm so it would probably have been what we call a funnel cloud.
The weather service learns of about one to three funnel clouds each year in parts of the valley, he said.
Reader David Murphy took this snap of the funnel cloud over houses in Woodvale
DELUGE: Funnel cloud hits Isle of Lewis and crowds flee for cover in Bexhill yesterday
This spring's tornado season got a late start, with unusually cool weather keeping funnel clouds at bay until mid-May.
Funnel clouds were reported in and near towns including Edmond and Shawnee, Oklahoma.
He said that the UK had seen plenty of reports of tornadoes and funnel clouds, which do not touch the ground, but not supercell storms, adding: "This one was fairly special.
Independent forecasters Irish Weather Online said more mid-air tornadoes - visible as narrow funnel clouds spinning below thunderstorms - were possible.
He also said there was no confirmation of funnel clouds that were reportedly sighted in the city.
One-third of the tourists experienced a tornado, while 50 percent spotted funnel clouds and more than 95 percent reported seeing a significant atmospheric event.
The Met Office regards funnel clouds as potentially dangerous should they ever touch down.
The controllers say the radios allow them to monitor tornado funnel clouds, but the FAA says controllers already have access to a "large amount" of weather information.
I've seen funnel clouds and tornados on television.
If they don't touch the ground they are funnel clouds.
The author rides along with a new breed, the "storm chasers," men and women who in their SUVs prowl the back highways of Oklahoma, Kansas or Nebraska in the months of May and June waiting for super-sized thunderstorms to develop, hoping to catch a glimpse of and record on film or camcorder their most fearsome spawn, the funnel clouds that pounce on towns and trailer parks.