frozen

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  • adj

Synonyms for frozen

icy

ice-cold

Synonyms

motionless

Synonyms

Synonyms for frozen

turned into ice

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Antonyms

absolutely still

devoid of warmth and cordiality

not thawed

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(used of foods) preserved by freezing sufficiently rapidly to retain flavor and nutritional value

not convertible to cash

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incapable of being changed or moved or undone

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References in periodicals archive ?
This line of descent connects his own poetry and the writings of Sebald to the melancholy characteristic of Modernist pessimism as experienced, in different ways, by Auden and Owen, in which frozenness usually connotes impotence and inability to act.
As Armstrong argues, the entrancement of Merlin is symbolic of the photographic process itself, where the subject is fixed in a frame where s/he will stand, bewitched and static, for ever--what Armstrong calls "the trancelike stillness of the gaze and the mute frozenness of the photograph" (p.
They chose to avoid, or at least to postpone immobility, indifference and frozenness.
The tense difference between the French copula in (42b) and its counterpart in the English gloss has to do with the high degree of frozenness of the French c'est cleft:
The corn they grow is stunted, their village "bare and arid [with] no sign of moving life"; "the stream was dry, like summer, dried up by the frozenness of the head-waters" (p.
Schulze leaves it open whether these East Germans' inner desert, emotional frozenness, and social paralysis are a legacy from their communist past or a reaction to the silent threat of imposed westernization.
Sensed it, rather--something about the frozenness of her face--and would have been surprised if he'd touched her and found she was alive.
And couldn't this serve also as a description of psychonalysis, a quest, by other means, for those lost regions of the self so that the woman who attempts to "rescue" the man from emotional inhibition or frozenness, to lead him back and forward, is metaphorically what Bergman is, literally, in Spellbound - i.
In this connection, Ahab is at most remote from Antigone maybe when the first refuses to help (by joining forces with) the Captain of the Rachel, Gardiner, to look for his lost members of the crew (his son was on the missing whaleboat): here Ahab's "iciness" and unfathomably deep blackness are revealed in all their horrific dimensions, reminding us of Urizen's rigid frozenness and gloom in matters of the will:
Thus, given their relative frozenness, collocations are a constituent element of the phraseological inventory of a language.