religion

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Synonyms for religion

Synonyms for religion

a system of religious belief

Synonyms for religion

a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny

References in periodicals archive ?
Smith, (26) a Supreme Court decision that weakened Free Exercise Clause protection.
For more than two decades, judges and scholars have tried to figure out whether the Free Exercise Clause guarantees equality or exemption--whether it secures a freedom under equal laws, without regard to one's religion, or a freedom from equal laws precisely on account of one's religion.
Further, there is no evidence in the drafting history that the changes to the language of the Free Exercise Clause were meant to alter this basic emphasis.
The following four simple tools for discerning the line between the Establishment and Free Exercise Clauses use court decisions as a guide.
63) Ultimately, however, the court held the school board's actions did not constitute a violation of the Free Exercise Clause or the Establishment Clause.
into the Free Exercise Clause so long as courts apply strict scrutiny to
The establishment and free exercise clauses of the First Amendment were intended to prevent the state from supplanting religious decisionmaking with state orthodoxies.
Supreme Court precedent addressing the Free Exercise Clause has most recently applied strict scrutiny to government regulations of religious conduct where the government has prevented an individual from practicing his religious beliefs only where the government action actively targeted religion.
Under the free exercise clause, is this interfering with the church's right to practice its faith the way it chooses without governmental interference?
The answers, however, may prove elusive, requiring the courts to continue to grapple with the precise meaning of the Free Exercise Clause.
Smith, the New York courts essentially had interpreted the New York State Constitution's Free Exercise Clause no differently than the U.
Woody (21) that under the free exercise clause of the First Amendment, members of the Native American Church who chew peyote as part of a religious service are immune to prosecution under the controlled substances section of the California Penal Code.
The second line of cases involves the Free Exercise Clause, which