address

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Synonyms for address

give a speech to

Synonyms

  • give a speech to
  • talk to
  • speak to
  • lecture
  • discourse
  • harangue
  • give a talk to
  • spout to
  • hold forth to
  • expound to
  • orate to
  • sermonize to

speak to

Synonyms

take aim at

Synonyms

address yourself to something

Synonyms

Synonyms for address

to direct speech to

Synonyms

to talk to an audience formally

to bring an appeal or request, for example, to the attention of

to mark (a written communication) with its destination

to devote (oneself or one's efforts)

to cause (something) to be conveyed to a destination

a usually formal oral communication to an audience

romantic attentions

behavior through which one reveals one's personality

the ability to say and do the right thing at the right time

Synonyms for address

(computer science) the code that identifies where a piece of information is stored

the place where a person or organization can be found or communicated with

the manner of speaking to another individual

a sign in front of a house or business carrying the conventional form by which its location is described

Related Words

the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball

Related Words

social skill

Synonyms

Related Words

give a speech to

put an address on (an envelope)

direct a question at someone

address or apply oneself to something, direct one's efforts towards something, such as a question

greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name

Synonyms

access or locate by address

adjust and aim (a golf ball) at in preparation of hitting

References in periodicals archive ?
Since the employment of different forms of address is standard in virtually all the cases, positive and negative politeness depend on the social position of the character.
In the tragedy and drama, however, forms of address are more various and their agreement or disagreement with the social status of the character is pronounced as the dramatic conflict requires.
This taxonomic inventory of the forms of address has been derived from a hand-made catalogue of all the syntactically marked off items of address in contexts from the six plays analysed.
Like with the other forms of address, Shakespeare exploits the possibility of using qualifying words with the form of address my lord to increase its expressiveness.
The forms of address gentlemen and mistress are used by Shakespeare essentially in accord with the norm: the first is applied to men of gentle birth attached to the household of the sovereign or other person of high rank, while the second is used with respect to a sweetheart or lady-love.
The limited volume of the present paper does not permit to complete the review and illustration of all the forms of address given in the inventory above.
The analysis of the use of the forms of address which had an established norm in Shakespeare's time allows a number of generalisations.
The various forms of address variously employed expose Shakespeare's exploitation of seven kinds of resources to increase their expressiveness: 1) the form of address complying with the established norm; 2) the form of address violating the established standard of usage; 3) qualifying words to a form of address as a source of emotive meaning and irony when the qualifying words form an acute contrast with the circumstances; 4) the initial, obliging use of address as a means of courtesy and that of the fixing of attention; 5) the permanent use of address, emphasising symmetrical and asymmetrical relations, 6) the reiterated address for emphasis, and 7) the missing address, implying familiarity.
It is only in the comedy that a concentration of forms of address conveying negative politeness is limited only to the role of realistic social significance.