Flannery O'Connor


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Synonyms for Flannery O'Connor

United States writer (1925-1964)

References in periodicals archive ?
He is not a traditional believer but lives what Flannery O'Connor called a "kind of subreligion which expresses its ultimate concern in images that have not yet broken through to show any recognition of a God who has revealed Himself.
Her books include the widely-lauded travel memoir, Miraculous Air: Journey of a Thousand Miles through Baja California, the Other Mexico, and Sky Over El Nido, which won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction.
Behind the scenes, hidden and elusive, a wild ragged figure flitting from tree to tree, motioning to us, as Flannery O'Connor wrote, but never quite perceptible; how brilliant and subtle, to not be evident and inarguable; what genius
I also want to thank Joshua Kitchens of Georgia College LITC and the Flannery O'Connor archives for help in procuring the image of Flannery O'Connor.
A Wreck on the Road to Damascus: Innocence, Guilt, & Conversion in Flannery O'Connor.
Flannery O'Connor in the Age of Terrorism: Essays on Violence and Grace.
are largely beyond me--if not beyond Flannery O'Connor.
I am talking, of course, about Flannery O'Connor, the subject of a touching new biography by Brad Gooch.
Besides Baum, we revisit Mary Shelley and Jane Austen--in the same story, no less--and Flannery O'Connor.
Lewis, Flannery O'Connor, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.
The Realist Short Story Of The Powerful Glimpse: Chekhov To Carver" by Kerry McSweeny (Molson Professor of English at McGill University, Montreal, Canada) focuses the professor's analytical commentary on the published writings of five acknowledged masters of the short story format: Anton Chekov, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, and Raymond Carver.
In the fiction of Flannery O'Connor and Edward Lewis Wallant we see two who indeed recognized the terms "power and wonde"; for these two "something"--the transcending avenue, the requisite means to an end that led man from this transitory life into life-eternal.
The late Catholic novelist Flannery O'Connor once observed, 'Smugness is the Catholic sin.
There are Catholics who believe, perhaps rightly, that Flannery O'Connor will eventually be declared, if not a saint, then surely a doctor of the Church, one of its official teachers.