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  • noun

Synonyms for fisher

someone whose occupation is catching fish

large dark brown North American arboreal carnivorous mammal

References in classic literature ?
To go back to Lucerne and its fishers, I concluded, after about nine hours' waiting, that the man who proposes to tarry till he sees something hook one of those well-fed and experienced fishes will find it wisdom to "put up at Gadsby's" and take it easy.
He goes thither at first as a hunter and fisher, until at last, if he has the seeds of a better life in him, he distinguishes his proper objects, as a poet or naturalist it may be, and leaves the gun and fish-pole behind.
But I see that if I were to live in a wilderness I should again be tempted to become a fisher and hunter in earnest.
Until, biting at my sharp hidden hooks, they have to come up unto MY height, the motleyest abyss-groundlings, to the wickedest of all fishers of men.
I wouldn't, Meg, your mother doesn't like it, you know," he whispered, leaning over her chair, as Ned turned to refill her glass and Fisher stooped to pick up her fan.
By the time Ben was fagged out, Tom had traded the next chance to Billy Fisher for a kite, in good repair; and when he played out, Johnny Miller bought in for a dead rat and a string to swing it with -- and so on, and so on, hour after hour.
Some went to the cottages amid the hills, some to the sea-side to watch above the humble fisher folks; but little Rose-Leaf and many others went into the noisy city.
Then, as if prompted to regularize his rather abrupt confidence, he said: "I've come down to see my cousin at Torwood; my name is Horne Fisher.
It doesn't seem a cozy way of doing it," remarked the man called Fisher.
He disliked the fisher folk, who were rough, uncouth, and went to chapel.
She told him quaint little stories of the smugglers, of wrecks, and the legends of the fisher people.
A Fisher once took his bagpipes to the bank of a river, and played upon them with the hope of making the fish rise; but never a one put his nose out of the water.
said the fisher folk on the shore, whispering a prayer as they turned to go home.
Here he overheard Mr Derby for many hours solacing himself at an entertainment which he that evening gave his friends, and to which Fisher had been invited.
He was a fisher that had lost his boat, and thus been driven to the deep-sea voyaging.