gap

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Synonyms for gap

Synonyms for gap

an opening, especially in a solid structure

a space or interval between objects or points

an interval during which continuity is suspended

to make a hole or other opening in

to open wide

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Synonyms for gap

a conspicuous disparity or difference as between two figures

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a narrow opening

a pass between mountain peaks

a difference (especially an unfortunate difference) between two opinions or two views or two situations

make an opening or gap in

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References in periodicals archive ?
He added that the gap is the key reason for obtaining funding, whether in the form of cheque factoring, financing of projects by banks, leasing of assets, and other forms of financing to solve the financing gap.
If everyone pays their fair share -- developing countries can close their financing gaps and promote inclusive growth.
Murray said that the crisis has exposed financing gaps totaling $100 million to $130 million in each of the three countries, and that the IMF is working with authorities to figure out additional funding.
John Ashe, President of the UN General Assembly, who spoke at the thematic debate on the promotion of investment in Africa, said Africa needed to bridge a huge financing gap and innovative financing must come from within the continent and from greater private sector investment, as well as public-private collaborations
The European Commission has issued a tender for a study on the structuring and financing of energy infrastructure projects, the financing gaps and recommendations regarding the new EU Energy Security and Infrastructure Instrument (EESII).
Meanwhile, International Finance Corporation, the bank's private-sector arm will run the USD10bn infrastructure crisis facility to help bridge financing gaps for programmes that use some private funding.
Noting that official development assistance has increased only nominally and that real aid inflows are still below the 1990 level and have declined in sub-Saharan Africa, it argues that African countries need to mobilize more domestic and external financial resources in order to fill the financing gaps and accelerate growth.