figure of speech

(redirected from Figurative Speech)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for figure of speech

Synonyms for figure of speech

References in periodicals archive ?
The multiplicity of figurative speech uses, metaphor and particularly personification
Although it requires much more research to fully substantiate this thesis, I think it is safe to suggest that figurative speech can be conceived as a subcategory of the much more encompassing category of "figurative performance.
In the final Section 6, the chances for solving the border problems between humour and figurative speech on purely cognitive grounds are called into question, and humour scholars are invited to strive for closer integration with researchers of the cultural and social aspects of human communication, also reconsidering the former theories of superiority/disparagement and relaxation/relief that have been declared tacitly obsolete and seek to discover the deeper collaborative drives of humour processes that Tony Veale has called 'social logic'.
In the 1960s two significant attempts were made to embed the units with twofold planes of meaning, including humour and figurative speech, into certain broader supersystems.
Greimas's interests are not specifically focused on the theory of humour or the theory of figurative speech, but on establishing a deductive theory of general semantics.
1991 [1989]: 33), however, the phenomena of figurative speech (metonymic quasi-tautologies, metaphors, irony, hyperbole and litotes) are handled as flouting forms of violations of conversational maxims, and in Searlean speech act pragmatics (see e.
Consequently, you should first craft a closing argument that requires you to use gestures, movement, mimicry, figurative speech, and the full dynamism of your own voice.
Although he does not discuss this term explicitly, it seems to be mainly a matter of style and figurative speech (compare "figura nouatum," chap.
And so I say, 'Panis est corpus' [bread is the body: the predication at issue] is a figurative speech speaking sacramentally; for it is a sacrament of his body" (450).
What Cranmer means by a denominative predication in an allegory, metaphor, or (other) figurative speech - metonomy, for a relevant example -- is of greater interest than Ogelthorpe's familiar assumption that figurative language is deceptive.
breade," Peter Martyr also objects that the Zwinglians "seldome make mension of the sacramental mutation of the bread & the wine, which yet is no small matter," and his objection approaches Cranmer's position in Oxford when Cranmer holds, "'Panis est corpus' is a figurative speech, speaking sacramentally" -- a figure, indeed, but given cert ain conditions, one that truly effects a change (fols.
In rebuttal, Cranmer replies, "I said not, that the words of Christ do work, but Christ himself; and he worketh by a figurative speech.