fiction

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Synonyms for fiction

tale

Synonyms

lie

Synonyms for fiction

any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea

a narrative not based on fact

Synonyms

Synonyms for fiction

a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact

a deliberately false or improbable account

References in periodicals archive ?
Such is the shifting nature of literature these days that literary studies frequently witnesses challenges to the boundaries between so-called mainstream fiction and various other prose genres.
Storhoff considers all of Johnson's major fiction published up until the time of the writing.
And they disguised their fictions in factual clothing: a traveler's account of faraway lands, the recently discovered journal of a shipwrecked sailor, or a historical record of the Black Plague.
Moreover, the perspective students formulate from readings and lectures on novels can harden into a discriminatory filter, a rigid scheme for sifting fictions and judging their quality.
That is, even while marveling at the array of distinctive fictions from culturally disparate groups, one may also be struck by marked continuities.
In revision, she argued, Austen moved towards a deeper personal involvement in, and discovery of, the "human core" of her fictions.
These fictions are about language, about themselves as fiction, about all language as fiction and about all self as language, i.
Two ways of representing the foreign - the empirical and the "culturally conditioned" - contribute to "early austral fiction," which Fausett traces back as far as Indian Ocean fictions of the Hellenistic Age, including Phaeacia in Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Atlantis, Theopompos of Chios's utopia from the mid-fourth-century B.
Gass has been saying it for more than 30 years now, in his four books of fiction (``Omensetter's Luck,'' ``In the Heart of the Heart of the Country,'' ``Willie Masters' Lonesome Wife'' and ``The Tunnel''), and in his four previous nonfiction works (``Fictions and the Figures of Life,'' ``On Being Blue,'' ``The World Within the Word'' and ``Habitations of the Word'').
But, notoriously, anything goes in fiction, and there are fictions which break the rules and allow the boundary between embedded and embedding fiction to dissolve.
the question of how we can be moved by fictions despite the fact that we do not believe the propositions that describe situations such as Anna Karenina's plight.
But in their very sleaziness, in their decidedly uneuphoric insistence on the visibility of class, its injuries, and its violence, they give the lie to the fashionable fictions that MOMA and other art institutions are now so eager to promote.
These fictions do not voic e black male freedom within or through the potential of (white) postmodernism.
Where else but in this state, home of the world's most proficient manufacture of fictions, should she ask fourteen-year-olds about their idea of happiness?
Consider the contents: a piece, subtitled "A Play of 19th and 20th Century Critical Fictions," that reads Richard Wagner and Antonin Artaud in relation to one another; a reading of Donna Haraway's "Manifesto for Cyborgs"; an essay with the permutating title "Aversion/Perversion/Diversion" that deals with gay identity; "Shadow and Ash," a multidiscursive piece that functions, I think, as a partial but perhaps typical itinerary of Delany's engaged and questing mind; an essay that describes itself as "Some Notes on Hart Crane"; and, as an appendix, a meditation called "Shadows," which Delany himself, in his preface, describes as follows: "If 'Shadow and Ash' is the most important essay here, then 'Shadows' is its lengthy, chrestomathic preface.