fiction

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  • noun

Synonyms for fiction

tale

Synonyms

lie

Synonyms for fiction

any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea

a narrative not based on fact

Synonyms

Synonyms for fiction

a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact

a deliberately false or improbable account

References in classic literature ?
I have no fictions that make for nobility and manhood.
The Confidence Man' (1857), his last serious effort in prose fiction, does not seem to require criticism.
After a lapse of half a century, he is writing this paragraph with a pain that would induce him to cancel it, were it not still more painful to have it believed that one whom he regarded with a reverence that surpassed the love of a brother was converted by him into the heroine of a work of fiction.
The Realists, who were undoubtedly the masters of fiction in their passing generation, and who prevailed not only in France, but in Russia, in Scandinavia, in Spain, in Portugal, were overborne in all Anglo-Saxon countries by the innumerable hosts of Romanticism, who to this day possess the land; though still, whenever a young novelist does work instantly recognizable for its truth and beauty among us, he is seen and felt to have wrought in the spirit of Realism.
I have called it one of the most remarkable coinci-dences in modern fiction.
He had discovered, in the course of his reading, two schools of fiction.
One luckless evening it occurred to me to test my wife's fidelity in a vulgar, commonplace way familiar to everyone who has acquaintance with the literature of fact and fiction.
I have only to request that you will bear in mind certain established truths, which occasionally escape your memory when you are reading a work of fiction.
I had four preferences: first, music; second, poetry; third, the writing of philosophic, economic, and political essays; and, fourth, and last, and least, fiction writing.
We will, if you'll be fiction and poetry editor," I said.
At Windygates, as elsewhere, we believed History to be high literature, because it assumed to be true to Authorities (of which we knew little)--and Fiction to be low literature, because it attempted to be true to Nature (of which we knew less).
Every shade of light and dark, of truth, and of fiction which is the veil of truth, is allowable in a work of philosophical imagination.
To represent a bad thing in its least offensive light is, doubtless, the most agreeable course for a writer of fiction to pursue; but is it the most honest, or the safest?
It is by falling into fiction, therefore, that we generally offend against this rule, of deserting probability, which the historian seldom, if ever, quits, till he forsakes his character and commences a writer of romance.
Bounderby's gold spoon which was generally received in Coketown, another prevalent fiction was very popular there.