fetal alcohol syndrome

(redirected from Fetal alcohol effects)
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Related to Fetal alcohol effects: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  • noun

Synonyms for fetal alcohol syndrome

a congenital medical condition in which body deformation occurs or facial development or mental ability is impaired because the mother drinks alcohol during pregnancy

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References in periodicals archive ?
While the diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are firm, the criteria for fetal alcohol effects are less clear and may overlap with other psychiatric and behavioral disorders, she said.
He urges doctors and geneticists to eliminate the diagnosis of fetal alcohol effects (FAE), considered a mild form of fetal alcohol syndrome.
While Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the best known and most severe effect of prenatal alcohol consumption (occurring most often in children born to women who drink heavily throughout their pregnancy), mothers who consume smaller amounts of alcohol during their pregnancy can also give birth to children who manifest fewer and more subtle abnormalities, such as attention and memory problems, impulsivity, aggression or social problems -- typically referred to as fetal alcohol effects.
Blood alcohol concentration: A critical factor for producing fetal alcohol effects.
Fetal alcohol effects among North American Indians: Evidence and implications for society.
Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE), Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome) which define the continuum of effects caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol.
Streisssguth and colleagues (43) conducted a large scale clinical study of 415 subjects diagnosed with either fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or fetal alcohol effects (FAE), and found that knowledgeable informants reported that 3% (5/162) of subjects age 6 to 11 years, 12% (21/163) of subjects age 12 to 20 years, and 23% (21/90) of adults age 21 to 51 years attempted suicide.
The behavioral and cognitive defects in children with fetal alcohol effects may be partly attributable to genetic psychiatric disorders, researchers reported in a poster presentation at a meeting sponsored by the American College of Medical Genetics.
18 a joint statement on the prevention of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) in Canada.
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