felon

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Synonyms for felon

Synonyms for felon

one who commits a crime

Synonyms for felon

References in periodicals archive ?
Rick Scott and Bondi required that felons must apply for reinstatement after a (http://www.
85 million number is derived from the population of felons currently serving time, combined with those released from prison in states where ex-felons can't vote.
Laws vary in other states, but voting rights are restored to felons in the vast majority of states upon completion of a sentence, including prison, parole and probation.
NO Felons shouldn't be allowed to vote until they have completed their sentences, paid restitution, and proved they've learned their lesson.
Consequently, the percentage of felons who cannot vote varies by state.
Some Republicans believe that felons are more likely to vote for Democrats than Republicans.
Eventually, the undercover store managed to buy 145 guns obtained through Wright and many others--and Wright was one of the many people indicted for being felons in possession of firearms.
Yanev is currently chairing an ad-hoc inquiry committee that investigates the actions of former President Georgi Parvanov and Vice President Angel Marin in granting citizenships and pardoning felons.
City of Chicago, (18) the Court, in dicta, called prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons "longstanding" and "presumptively lawful.
I believe there is one issue overlooked in the recent debate over admission of felons to The Florida Bar.
The Second Circuit consolidated two cases involving aliens who appealed decisions of the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) ordering them removed as aggravated felons.
Morley Swingle to lobby for changes to Missouri's statute prohibiting some felons from possessing firearms.
Tennessee is one of 48 states that deny felons voting rights and one of 11 that does not automatically restore those rights when offenders complete their sentences, including any probation and parole.