Felis silvestris


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Related to Felis silvestris: European wild cat
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Synonyms for Felis silvestris

bushy-tailed wildcat of Europe that resembles the domestic cat and is regarded as the ancestor of the domestic cat

References in periodicals archive ?
The European wildcat Felis silvestris is a medium-sized, elusive carnivore widely but patchily distributed throughout the Palaearctic (Yamaguchi et al.
1999: Iberian wild cat Felis silvestris tartessia predation on rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus: functional response and age selection.
Among its wild-living members, the genus includes Felis chaus (jungle cats), Felis nigripes (black-footed cats), Felis margarita (sand cats) and Felis silvestris (wildcats).
IUCN Red List (2013) Felis Silvestris (Wildcat, Wild Cat).
2008: Cats and seabirds: effects of feral Domestic Cat Felis silvestris ca tus eradication on the population of Sooty Terns Ony choprion fuscata on Ascension Island, South Atlantic.
But they complicate any effort to think clearly about drawing other lines, such as the line between Felis silvestris lybica and Felis silvestris catus, the line between embryo transfer and nuclear transfer, the line between genetically modified organisms and heirloom tomatoes (which have themselves been genetically modified by generations of careful horticulture), the line between extinct and merely frozen, the line between what we can do and what we should do, the line between nature and ART.
The wildcat, Felis silvestris mostly feeds on Apodemus but they also feed on Arvicola in the spring, summer, and autumn (Pineiro and Barja,2011).
Trophic strategy of the wildcat Felis silvestris in relation to seasonal variation in the availability and vulnerability to capture of Apodemus mice.
To address the question whether a change in size can be seen in another European carnivore species, the European wildcat Felis silvestris Schreber, 1777, was selected.
This study addresses the question whether a change in size measured by weight and body length occurred in the European wildcat Felis silvestris silvestris over the last century and with mean annual temperature.
Domestic cats are still similar enough to their wild ancestor to belong to its species, Felis silvestris, explains Carlos Driscoll of the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md.