adipose tissue

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Related to Fat cells: liposuction, Macrophages, Red blood cells, Blood cells, Bone cells, Adipose cells
  • noun

Synonyms for adipose tissue

a kind of body tissue containing stored fat that serves as a source of energy

References in periodicals archive ?
The CoolSculpting procedure is based on the scientific principle that fat cells are more sensitive to cold than the overlying skin and surrounding tissues.
Researchers also disrupted the IRK3 gene in the fat cells of normal-weight mice.
The body will continue, however, to naturally flush out the dead fat cells for up to six months after treatment.
He explained that since leptin was produced by fat cells, the level of the fat reserves were measured, while the insulin gave a measure of future fat reserves.
In contrast, using brown fat cells removed from humans during surgery, the scientists investigated the signaling pathway for fat activation using adenosine.
The correlation between these two factors leads to an interruption of fat cell development, which could result in issues with fat storage within the cells and it getting into the bloodstream.
The pore which is created in the fat cell closes naturally after about 72 hours so there is no lasting damage to the cell.
CoolSculpting is based on the scientific principle that fat cells are more sensitive to cold than the overlying skin and surrounding tissues.
the F1 generation) of mice exposed to TBT during pregnancy showed marked increases in the number and size of white fat cells and significant but less pronounced increases in the weight of white fat deposits (or "depots") around the kidney and under the skin.
This is the revolutionary new way to kill fat cells, now available in Scotland for the first time.
A preliminary new study suggests that the pungent component in black pepper known as piperine fights fat by blocking the formation of new fat cells, Health News reported.
Scientists have made a key observation regarding how fat cells (adipocytes) interact with tumor cells and thereby allow a cancer to thrive in dense breast tissue or a fatty liver.
Mice lacking the gene also had twice as many brown fat cells as normal mice.
When adults overeat, the fat cells in their waist expand, while the fat cells in their thighs grow in number, at least in the short run.
The team measured the fat cells in different areas of the body before and after the experiment.