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  • noun

Words related to farthing

a former British bronze coin worth a quarter of a penny

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References in classic literature ?
I mean," said Colbert, "that besides those forty millions, five hundred and sixty thousand, two hundred livres, nine cents, eight farthings, there are thirteen millions that are not known.
Fifteen sous, four farthings, parisian, for having worn two rosaries
Now art thou the man for my farthing," cried the messenger.
Yes, I paid it, every farthing,' replied Squeers, who seemed to know the man he had to deal with, too well to suppose that any blinking of the question would induce him to subscribe towards the expenses; 'I wasn't out of pocket by it after all, either.
The windows were often frozen over; but then they heated copper farthings on the stove, and laid the hot farthing on the windowpane, and then they had a capital peep-hole, quite nicely rounded; and out of each peeped a gentle friendly eye--it was the little boy and the little girl who were looking out.
Tinker, flinging down the coin; it's only baronets as cares about farthings.
Two half-pence is all the same, and four farthings is received with joy.
Not fifteen farthings a day can she earn, if she is respectable and has no special talent and that without putting her work down for an instant
Yes; these laws might be engraven on a Queen Anne's farthing, or the barb of a harpoon, and worn round the neck, so small are they.
answered Heathcliff; "but his life is not worth a farthing, and I won't spend a farthing on him.
He had married a poor ignorant woman, who had served as a waitress at some low eating-house, who had unexpectedly come into a little money, and whose small inheritance he had mercilessly squandered to the last farthing.
Such was the author of "The Little Duke" and "The Dove in the Eagle's Nest," such the author of "A Flatiron for a Farthing," and "The Story of a Short Life.
Fogg proceeded to pay the guide the price agreed upon for his service, and not a farthing more; which astonished Passepartout, who remembered all that his master owed to the guide's devotion.
The man, as a matter of fact, under no circumstances, ever cared a brass farthing for what I or anybody else in his ship thought.
Yet he knew when closing-time came, that he had exhausted every farthing he possessed in the world - it seemed hopeless to imagine that he could survive another day.