Eurafrican


Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Eurafrican

a person of mixed European and African descent

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Her staccato approach and thin archival evidence mean the omission of incremental details essential to explaining and nuancing broad historical processes, such as the struggle for equal ritual and burial rights among Eurafrican Jews, or language shift among Jews of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry.
These comparative questions are especially relevant for Suriname, where the categories of Jews and Eurafricans overlapped conspicuously.
Whether specialists or undergraduates, readers will appreciate the volume's continued interest in the experiences of women and Eurafrican Jews.
While others dismiss multiracial individuals as racist or British loyalists, Lee unpacks the complex manner in which Anglo-Africans, Eurafricans, and Euro-Africans called for social and political membership.
But Anglo-Africans, Euro-Africans, and Eurafricans did not see themselves as Coloured or as fixed in nativist hierarchies.
In chapters six ("Racism as a Weapon of the Weak") and seven ("Loyalty and Disregard"), I found Lee's discussion of the internal debates within these multiracial communities fascinating, especially how carefully he pieces together the Eurafricans in Southern Rhodesia's not-so-subtle racism and unsettling pledges of loyalty to the British empire.
Brooks, Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Cender, and Religious Observance from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century (Athens OH: Ohio University Press, 2003).
Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Gender and Religious Observance from the Sixteenth to Eighteenth Century (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press; Oxford: James Currey, 2003) 355 pp.
Brooks, Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Qender, and Religious Observance from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century (Ohio University Press/James Currey, Athens/Oxford, 2003); George E.
Based on tantalizing bits in archival sources, she traces the complicated ways Eurafricans became a significant part of the community, both demographically and in terms of communal organization and the construction of the local meanings of Jewishness.
In Suriname, Creoles are Eurafricans who trace their ancestry to manumission or emancipation, as opposed to marronage.