eudaimonia

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Synonyms for eudaimonia

a contented state of being happy and healthy and prosperous

References in periodicals archive ?
And, eudemonia may literally be translated from the original Greek as "flourishing.
This paper details a targeted literature summary based on Hayward and Taylor's (2011) definition of eudemonia.
2 The origin of the concept of Eudemonia is based in Aristotelian philosophy.
These conditions of dynamic tension that create the integrity of civilization require the conditions of what the Ancient Greeks referred to as phronesis, or practical wisdom, which was achieved through experience and education in the arts, sciences and virtues, or paedeia, and dialectic, with the ultimate goal being the achievement of eudemonia, the good life.
As we flourish, we help to improve the quality of life of those around us; this is why the Greek concept of happiness, eudemonia, was not thought of as the immediacy of pleasure but as human flourishing in the aggregate.
He meant something like the word Aristotle used when musing on humans' purpose: eudemonia, which means contentment, or flourishing.
JSBC Eudemonia Blue Ocean TV & Movie Group, Yunnan Film Group presentation of a We Pictures production.
They call for a return to the Ancient Greeks and in particular to Aristotle's notion of happiness as eudemonia.
The theory of eudemonia associated with the meaning orientation, on the other hand, also has a long tradition stemming from Aristotle's notion according to which happiness is achieved by identifying one's virtues and developing them (Seligman, 2002).
El descubrimiento del cosmos interior como conocimiento de los bienes supremos, indican que la eudemonia es esencialmente espiritual.
A decade ago, writing a brief history of this magazine for the sixtieth anniversary issue, I used a word you don't see around very much -- eudemonia -- but it seems as appropriate now as it did then.