ethics

(redirected from Ethical theory)
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  • noun

Synonyms for ethics

moral code

Synonyms

Synonyms for ethics

References in periodicals archive ?
In the conclusion, Kowalski shows and states that elements of ethical theory such as the concept of natural law are subject to theoretical interpreters, with the understanding that their belief systems are a factor, regarding their acceptance or rejection of such concepts.
Recall and understand several approaches to professional ethics, including utilitarian ethics, virtue-based ethical theory, and moral motivation theory.
The authors then consider the approach taken by many ethicists to applied ethics, of constructing an ethical theory of corporate social responsibility, such as the stakeholder model (which seems to be the favorite model of most business ethics texts).
Kuhn's theory of paradigms and Lakatos's account of research programs provided MacIntyre with a means to express clearly his basic idea that a particular ethical theory could not be properly understood without an intimate knowledge of the immediate social and historical contexts in which it was produced.
In order to demonstrate that the Dalai Lama's ethical theory is better understood as an instance of virtue ethics, I will use the same procedure as Goodman.
The two essays prepared by the primary researcher to explicate Western ethical theory and the ethical decision-making framework were assigned for study.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory going back to Jeremy Bentham (2009), James Mill (1829), John Stuart Mill (2002) and others.
The methodology involves a careful mining of the textual sources for passages that support the western ethical theory that the author advances.
Underlying the entire argument is an extremely strong commitment to utilitarianism as the only valid normative ethical theory.
Can we use ethical theory to help design these machines?
They focus instead on similarities, meaning that a short list of ordinarily accepted guidelines threads through almost every ethical theory.
Informed consent has a history in law, ethical theory, and clinical practice (Faden and Beauchamp 1986, Appelbaum et al 1987, Beauchamp and Childress 1994).
Fort Collins) presents an accessible introduction to the nature of ethical theory, reasoning and decision- making, and its practical application to veterinary medicine.
Evans argues that a Christian divine command ethical theory is not only defensible, but superior to those two alternatives.
Both essays present useful interaction with Edwards's ethical theory.