hormone replacement therapy

(redirected from Estrogen-replacement therapy)
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Related to Estrogen-replacement therapy: HRT
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  • noun

Synonyms for hormone replacement therapy

hormones (estrogen and progestin) are given to postmenopausal women

References in periodicals archive ?
The most recent health issue for menopausal and pre-menopausal women is that hormone-replacement therapy can be a dicey proposition, with studies talking about increased risk of breast cancer, stroke, and heart attacks in women taking a combination of estrogen and progestin, and a greater risk of ovarian cancer for women using just estrogen-replacement therapy.
Dietary soy may reduce the risk of cancer by counteracting the cell-proliferating effect of estrogen-replacement therapy.
Estrogen-replacement therapy and Alzheimer's disease in the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging.
Though estrogen-replacement therapy has become a popular long-term treatment for menopausal women, Love argues that evidence of its safety and necessity is so far inconclusive.
In the study of 37 postmenopausal women, elevated levels of zinc in the urine decreased after several months of estrogen-replacement therapy, reported Mala Herzberg and her team of researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel.
The researchers gave cognitive tests to 81 women who had never received hormones and 103 women who had received estrogen-replacement therapy, sometimes with progesterone, for periods of 6 months to more than 20 years.
Similarly, the treatment did not "negate the beneficial effects of oral estrogen-replacement therapy on hot flashes and serum concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol," Dr.
While estrogen-replacement therapy has definite cardioprotective effects, primarily because it raises the level of high-density lipoproteins and reduces the level of low-density lipoproteins, it is no substitute for a low-fat, vegetablerich diet and regular exercise.
Moreover, women taking estrogen-replacement therapy have roughly twice the incidence of lung cancer that other women have, although the risk is small among nonsmokers.
While estrogen-replacement therapy has definite cardioprotective effects, primarily because it raises the level of high-density lipoproteins and reduces the level of lowdensity lipoproteins, it is no substitute for a low-fat, vegetable-rich diet and regular exercise.