Darwin

(redirected from Erasmus Darwin)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Erasmus Darwin: Charles Lyell
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Darwin

English natural scientist who formulated a theory of evolution by natural selection (1809-1882)

provincial capital of the Northern Territory of Australia

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
John Ray, Erasmus Darwin, Robert Chambers, Shailer Mathews, Andrew Dickson White .
Erasmus Darwin versifies the Linnaean system of botany in "The Loves of the Plants" (1789), the second part of his long scientific poem, The Botanic Garden, capitalizing on the system's concern with sexuality that excited frequent comparison between plants and humans, generating potential for sensationalism that generally attracted rather than deterred interest.
Elizabeth Willis's essay, "Bright Ellipses: The Botanic Garden, Meteoric Flowers, and Leaves of Grass," for example, begins with Erasmus Darwin, a very interesting poet-scientist whose didactic poems written in eighteenth-century couplet style were quite popular, and exerted influence on more canonical poets such as Shelley.
The new trail will tell the story of the original Lunar Society and venues featured will include Soho House in Handsworth, which was Boulton's home and also a meeting place for the group, the Black Country Living Museum, Erasmus Darwin House in Lichfield and Derby Art Gallery.
Mr Day, who began teaching at Erasmus Darwin in 2012, admitted a string of teaching misdemeanours.
Erasmus Darwin suffers none of these social pressures to exclude the suggestive analogies.
One writer who was particularly interested in the bridge between science and literature was Erasmus Darwin, whose The Botanic Garden (1791) constitutes a hybrid work between botanical description and sexual poetry.
HIS famous grandfather would have been proud of Erasmus Darwin, who added further distinction to the illustrious family name.
He cites the Lunar Society of Birmingham, a forward thinking club whose members included steam pioneers Matthew Boulton and James Watt, physician Erasmus Darwin, potter Josiah Wedgwood and Joseph Priestley, who discovered oxygen.
All of the ideas credited to Darwin had been discussed in print by others before him, including his grandfather Erasmus Darwin, whose major influence Darwin never acknowledged.
Erasmus Darwin, physician, botanist, philosopher, inventor, and poet, was one of the outstanding intellectuals of eighteenth-century England in an era noted for men of intellectual brilliance.
It was founded in 1764-1765 by Erasmus Darwin, Matthew Boulton, and Charles Small.
The difficulty with writing about Erasmus Darwin is the breadth of his interests and achievements: physician, poet, scientist arguing for evolution, agricultural improvements, industrialisation, improved transport systems, women's education and the rebellious minority in the American colonies.
Penned by the remarkable British polymath Erasmus Darwin, these lines direct us to the sky's north ecliptic pole, enwrapped in the great bend of Draco that starts behind the Dragon's head.
Bergman seems to chastise and devalue Darwin because others such as Erasmus Darwin, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, Robert Chambers, and Patrick Miller had talked about evolution before him.