Englishwoman


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  • noun

Words related to Englishwoman

a woman who is a native or inhabitant of England

References in classic literature ?
The conversation took place in English--a language which D'Artagnan could not understand; but by the accent the young man plainly saw that the beautiful Englishwoman was in a great rage.
He stood, in dead silence, looking long and anxiously at the beautiful Englishwoman.
Her maid, an Englishwoman, has declared that she will serve the Countess no longer.
You have a rare accomplishment for an Englishwoman," he resumed--"you walk well.
Vimeux was prepared, in accordance with fixed principles, to marry a hunch-back with six thousand a year, or a woman of forty-five at eight thousand, or an Englishwoman for half that sum.
Jonathan's nurse was also an Englishwoman, and when he was about a year old she was called home to England to a dying friend.
I'm an Englishwoman - and I don't see why any one should doubt it - and I was born in the country, neither in the extreme north nor south of our happy isle; and in the country I have chiefly passed my life, and now I hope you are satisfied; for I am not disposed to answer any more questions at present.
One of the younger women kept staring at the Englishwoman, who was dressing after all the rest, and when she put on her third petticoat she could not refrain from the remark, "My, she keeps putting on and putting on, and she'll never have done
I didn't notice the name, but she was an Englishwoman.
Oh, what Pagan emotions to expect from a Christian Englishwoman anchored firmly on her faith!
The best and dearest Englishwoman in the world understands them.
Thou'st no delight in following the hounds as an Englishwoman should have,' said the gentleman.
Father and Mother Meagles sat with their daughter between them, the last three on one side of the table: on the opposite side sat Mr Clennam; a tall French gentleman with raven hair and beard, of a swart and terrible, not to say genteelly diabolical aspect, but who had shown himself the mildest of men; and a handsome young Englishwoman, travelling quite alone, who had a proud observant face, and had either withdrawn herself from the rest or been avoided by the rest--nobody, herself excepted perhaps, could have quite decided which.
The reserved Englishwoman took up Mr Meagles in his last remark.
I then took a good lodging in the house of an Englishwoman, where several merchants lodged, some French, two Italians, or rather Jews, and one Englishman.