Elijah Muhammad


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  • noun

Synonyms for Elijah Muhammad

leader of Black Muslims who campaigned for independence for Black Americans (1897-1975)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Tilleraas's new book, This Side of Paradise: The Religious World of Elijah Muhammad ($14.
If Elijah Muhammad died tomorrow, he'd be the biggest thing in the world.
Shabazz was sent to Newark in 1959 by Elijah Muhammad and stayed among the people of the NOI until 1973, the year he was murdered by a rival group.
There are accusations of Farrakhan abandoning the separatist and apocalyptic teachings of Elijah Muhammad and indoctrinating his followers with the systems of L.
Moreover, Marable astutely tracks the gradually widening rift between Elijah Muhammad and Malcolm after the latter, influenced by both the Civil Rights movement and his Hajj to Mecca, distanced himself from black separatism.
While a leader in the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X tried, at the urging of the Nation's head, Elijah Muhammad, to forge an alliance between the Nation and the American Nazi Party and the Ku Klux Klan.
It presents a brief history of Elijah Muhammad, the founder of the Nation of Islam, and provides an overview of his philosophy of education, especially as it pertains to Black America.
Black Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad had only recently been released from his jail sentence for draft evasion during World War II, and Malcolm X--in jail for burglary--had not yet completed his conversion to the Nation of Islam.
Malcolm X had long been tipped to take over from the NoI's ageing leader, Elijah Muhammad.
In that year, Noble Drew Ali, a precursor of Elijah Muhammad, organized what he called the Canaanite Temple in Newark, New Jersey.
He remembers the irritation produced by his first meeting with Elijah Muhammad, whose mission he sees as understandable but divisive.
After a falling out with Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm underwent another transformation in 1964.
Of special significance is the inclusion of Clara Muhammad, the wife of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam.
The second part of the book looks at the emergence of Islam among the African-descended in the US in the 20th century, with successive chapters on Noble Drew Ali, Elijah Muhammad, and Malcolm X.
He first contacted me as a reviewer in 1997, asking me if I would be interested in reviewing a biography of Elijah Muhammad, the notorious head of the Nation of Islam, implicated in the death of Malcolm X.