Socratic method

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  • noun

Synonyms for Socratic method

a method of teaching by question and answer

References in periodicals archive ?
31) That, after all, is the fundamental principle of the elenchus.
Further, elenchus takes time to unfold and may be somewhat unwieldy in an operational environment.
Rather than hovering amidst the clouds, this 'mature' Socrates practised elenchus, a 'rough' sceptical ascent starting from citizens' doxa about 'political things'--virtues, types of individuals, and the good life--towards the Truth.
The most familiar form of this process is the Socratic elenchus in which an interlocutor's thesis on an essential question is examined in order to show by a series of questions and answers in what way the thesis contradicts itself and therefore cannot hold as true, and yet also in what way it may serve in an ambiguous and partial manifestation of truth, which then needs to be incorporated into a more "synoptic" understanding.
Iosephi Scaligeri Elenchus, et Castigatio Calendarii Gregoriani (Rome, 1595), 48-50.
Socratic elenchus, for example, does not require any commitment to a foundationalist view of "universal reason": one can start the dialectic anywhere, with anyone, and generate a clearer view of what anything, from Courage to Piety to Justice, really is.
9) The Socratic elenchus (refutation) is a test, then, of the interlocutor's character, and successful elenchus entails moral reform.
Socrates's frequent practice of the elenchus and his refusal to reveal his own views reveals that Socrates held these views 'in a spirit of open inquiry' and that he was never fully satisfied with the current level of his understanding (44).
DYLAN FUTTER, "Belief and Persuasion in the Socratic Elenchus.
A review of his novel Closing Time by Pieter Steinz 1994:4 is titled "Socrates in New York"; for a study of the function of the elenchus in his novel Something Happened, see Furlani 1995:252-270.
2) This division can be as simple as a switch from Socrates' elenchus of Thrasymachus in Book I to Plato's positive doctrine in Books II-X.
Heidegger constantly places this manner of thinking in dialogue with the metaphysical tradition, not least with Socratic Elenchus.
was undoubtedly a Platonic project, and not merely an Aristotelian development," and that this endeavor requires "the three methods of elenchus, of diairesis-and-synagoge, and of analysis-and-synthesis" as illuminating all things (pp.
The Elenchus of Biblica (formerly Elenchus Bibliographicus Biblicus) had a section "Historia Exegeseos" in the inaugural volume of Biblica (1920), but with very few entries.
Benson here presents a comprehensive account of the problems and questions that have been posed about this method, including the view that there is in fact no Socratic elenchus in the dialogues.