election

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  • noun

Synonyms for election

Synonyms for election

the act of choosing

Words related to election

the act of selecting someone or something

the status or fact of being elected

Related Words

the predestination of some individuals as objects of divine mercy (especially as conceived by Calvinists)

References in classic literature ?
It gave them pleasure to believe this, for Scully stood as the people's man, and boasted of it boldly when election day came.
Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes.
They still insisted that victory could be gained through the elections.
Ernest's chance for election grew stronger and stronger.
He knew that it was himself, the thin and white-cheeked minister, who had done and suffered these things, and written thus far into the Election Sermon
Will not my aid be requisite to put you in heart and strength to preach your Election Sermon?
My boy, I hope you will always defend your sister, and give anybody who insults her a good thrashing -- that is as it should be; but mind, I won't have any election blackguarding on my premises.
Judge Driscoll's election labors had prostrated him, but it was said that as soon as he was well enough to entertain a challenge he would get one from Count Luigi.
But because there is, in man, an election touching the frame of his mind, and a necessity in the frame of his body, the stars of natural inclination are sometimes obscured, by the sun of discipline and virtue.
But you will contribute something to the campaign fund to assist in your election, will you not?
It was early in the evening, and the only reason we were there was because we were broke and it was election time.
Julius was offering himself for election in Perthshire, by his father's express desire, at that moment.
When anne came downstairs again, the Island, as well as all Canada, was in the throes of a campaign preceding a general election.
The principle of election made it for a long while the great political power.
The noise and bustle which ushered in the morning were sufficient to dispel from the mind of the most romantic visionary in existence, any associations but those which were immediately connected with the rapidly-approaching election.