irenic

(redirected from Eirenic)
Also found in: Dictionary.
  • adj

Synonyms for irenic

inclined or disposed to peace; not quarrelsome or unruly

Words related to irenic

conducive to peace

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
The animus against such people is shown by the fact that John Mason Neale, normally a sensible and eirenic man, could not only write but even publish the following:
The central contentions of this paper are two: first, that contextualism about knowledge cannot fulfill the eirenic promise which, for those who are drawn to it, constitutes its main attraction; second, that the basic diagnosis of epistemological skepticism as somehow entrapping us, by diverting attention from a surreptitious shift to a special rarefied intellectual context, rests on inattention to the details of the principal skeptical paradoxes.
Presumably, although Dumont does not say this as such, the recognition that one's own values are relative will have actional consequences as well, at least of an eirenic sort.
The compilers of the AV are described as "a generous slice of Jacobean England," serving a monarch whose vision of universal peace was "a fantasy too far" and who wished to "embrace a broad stretch of middle ground"--a truly eirenic ambition.
In this vein, the Methodist movement took an eirenic stance and strove to promote social projects, which included welfare provision, schools, and medical dispensaries.
Wilson's analysis here has much to commend it, but he undoubtedly overplays the High Church orientation of the SPCK and pays less attention to the eirenic Anglicanism of these societies.
McBee makes an interesting revelation in his book, An Eirenic Itinerary, written in 1911.
In his book Eirenic Itinerary Silas McBee described a meeting he had with Cardinal Rampolla in 1911.
The eirenic or moderate plan of the book is less successful on the more basic issue of what makes science rational.
But today it has been left to France to produce a truly appropriate and eirenic modern memorial to the slaughter of 1914-18, despite her casualties being much greater than those of the British Empire and having had much of the country ravaged by four years of trench warfare.