ovum

(redirected from Egg cells)
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  • noun

Synonyms for ovum

the female reproductive cell

References in periodicals archive ?
This had previously been achieved with mouse egg cells, while human eggs had been successfully cultivated starting from a much later stage of development.
Yet, egg cells are created inside a woman's body before she is born.
British researchers became the first in the world to produce healthy mice with a technique that bypasses the normal step of fertilising an egg cell with sperm.
In this study, the scientists triggered unfertilized human egg cells into dividing.
The researchers found that a protein called SAS1B that is typically found only on the surface of developing and mature egg cells is also expressed in breast, melanoma, uterine, renal, ovarian, head and neck, and pancreatic cancers.
Egg cells are thousands of times larger than normal cells," he said.
The key to this success was finding a way to prompt egg cells to stay in a state called "metaphase" during the nuclear transfer process.
A key problem has been that human egg cells appear more fragile than those of other species.
That possibility came a bit closer to reality when Japanese scientists announced that they had grown viable mouse egg cells (some shown below), or oocytes, in the lab from embryonic stem cells and from reprogrammed stem cells (SN: 11/3/12, p.
A key aspect of animal fertilization is the development of sperm and egg cells that have half the number of chromosomes as that found in most cells of the parent organism.
Scientists hope to fertilise the first human egg cells grown in a lab from stem cells later this year, it emerged yesterday.
Female egg cells, on the other hand, stop replicating during foetal development in the womb after about 30 generations.
The technology, in which egg cells are fertilised outside the body and implanted in the womb, led to the birth of Louise Brown in 1978.
The technology which the pair developed, in which egg cells are fertilised outside the body and implanted in the womb, led to the birth of Louise Brown in 1978.