efferent

(redirected from Efferent ductules)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for efferent

References in periodicals archive ?
Testes are connected to the epididymis by the efferent ductules, a bundle of small ductules, slightly sinuous, which meet and lead into the epididymal duct (Figure 2D).
The efferent ductules and epididymal ducts are bound by peritoneal conjunctive tissue.
The seminiferous or spermatic ducts, efferent ductules, epididymis and deferent ducts are derived from archinephric duct, which is an organ for the transport of both urine and sperm in anamniotic vertebrates (ROMER; PARSONS, 1985; ORR, 1986).
The efferent ductules are a network of small ducts that conduct sperm from the testes to the epididymis (ASCHLEY, 1969; ROMER; PARSONS, 1985, CABRAL et al.
EXPRESSION AND LOCALIZATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR[alpha] (ER[alpha]) AND ER[beta] IN THE EFFERENT DUCTULES
EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS ON THE EFFERENT DUCTULES
Estrogen receptor expression in developing epididymis, efferent ductules and other male reproductive organs.
The fungicide benomyl (methyl 1-(butylcarbamoyl)-2-benzimidazolecarbamate) causes testicular dysfunction by inducing the sloughing of germ cells and occlusion of efferent ductules.
Our understanding of the pathogenesis of PCE in VHLD has been enhanced by 2 recent reports demonstrating that, in patients with VHLD, PCE arises in the efferent ductules of the head of the epididymis, is of mesonephric origin, and is preceded by morphologically, immunohistochemically, and genetically similar precursor lesions.
Efferent ductules (ED), part of the excurrent ducts in the male reproductive tract, are the sites where the majority of testicular fluid is reabsorbed, resulting in a several fold increase in sperm concentration (Clulow et al.
Immunohistochemical localization of ER[alpha] and ER[beta] in the efferent ductules
Expression of mRNA and immunohistochemical localization of CAII in the efferent ductules