Edward R. Murrow

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  • noun

Synonyms for Edward R. Murrow

United States broadcast journalist remembered for his reports from London during World War II (1908-1965)

References in periodicals archive ?
The American broadcaster Ed Murrow said: 'He mobilised the English language and sent it into battle.
n the '50s, during the era of America's Ed Murrow, the media reported the message.
There are rare photos, such as a smiling Ed Murrow, or a shot of three-year-old songstress Brenda Lee with Spike Jones, or of the special device constructed for President Franklin Roosevelt so he could stand during his radio addresses.
In one of the after-work seminars Ed Murrow used to conduct in Colbee's bar on 52nd Street back in New York, he said, "Just remember that even though you have a loud voice, even though your voice may reach 16 million people every time you speak, that doesn't make you any smarter than you were when your voie only reached the end of this bar.
And that night the great reporter Ed Murrow told America's radio listeners: "Tonight in London, the command seems to be: prepare for action.
His perfect performance as camp writer Truman Capote will edge out fellow real-life characters Johnny Cash (Joaquin Phoenix) in Walk the Line and Ed Murrow (David Strathairn) in Good Night, And Good Luck.
The playwright drew a parallel between the depiction of how journalist Ed Murrow resisted McCarthy in George Clooney's Oscar-nominated film Good Night and Good Luck and the struggle writers here could face should the Government's bill become law.
Television has a huge role, and has had since Ed Murrow, in bringing information.
The journalists I admire - from William Howard Russell who exposed the disaster of Britain's Crimea War, to the great American reporters Martha Gellhorn and Ed Murrow who told of people's struggle against poverty, fear and racism, to Robert Fisk, my contemporary, who has reported the truth about the Middle East - have all contributed something significant to our victories over ignorance and oppression.
The film features the conflict between TV news pioneer Ed Murrow and Senator Joseph McCarthy, played by himself in newsreel footage
The positions he took when it came to CBS and its coverage of politics, particularly the Ed Murrow confrontation with Senator Joe McCarthy in the mid '50s and the early Nixon era, make the blood boil in part because of his disloyalty to the men he had sponsored and nurtured in the News division.