echidna

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  • noun

Synonyms for echidna

a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termites

a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termites

References in periodicals archive ?
To catch a glimpse of the beginnings of the mammal dynasty, the series includes a journey to Australia to meet some of the most ancient creatures in the world - the echidna and the platypus.
While I do not condone the eating of echidnas, Howitt's account of the taste of echidna is in some ways representative of a culture of paying attention to one's surroundings, of using all one's senses to "observe".
At the National Park visitor centre we spotted an echidna pushing its snout through the earth in search of tasty morsels.
The IslandOs prolific wildlife includes kangaroos, koalas, seals and sea lions, echidnas and rare birds.
Black swans have amazing courtship rituals and even echidnas get 'horny', forming mating trains.
In addition, an extended stay on Kangaroo Island allows participants to experience close-up encounters with fur seals, koalas, kangaroos, echidnas, reptiles, wildflowers, and some of the 250 species of birds found on the island.
The kangaroos are feeling bouncy, the echidnas are being prickly, the emus are feeling peckish and possums are just hanging around.
research was at the Bronx Zoo in New York, managed to capture and attach transmitters to 22 echidnas.
Just a handful of mammals lay eggs, including the platypus and echidnas featured in this section.
Some fish have electroreceptors, as do echidnas, the other egg-laying mammal.
However, other recently painted motifs within the shelter indicate that Namarrkon was not the only preoccupation of the artists, as the best-preserved paintings here are a pair of white+red 'echidnas' (Figure 10): echidnas were both a totemic animal and a favoured food on the plateau.
Captive echidnas - spiny anteaters - have been known to stack drinking containers in a corner to climb out of a cage.
These include the aardwolves of Africa, the aardvarks ("ground pig" in Afrikaans) and the pangolins of Africa and Asia, and the numbats and echidnas, primitive egg-laying mammals of Australia.
Echidnas and the duckbilled platypus are the only egg-laying mammals.