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  • noun

Synonyms for Ecclesiasticus

an Apocryphal book mainly of maxims (resembling Proverbs in that respect)

References in periodicals archive ?
Blasien, De statutis ecclesiasticus sobrie legendis, MGHLibelli 2, 157.
Lambeth Palace Library ED 1328, See also Valor Ecclesiasticus ed.
In connection with the mnemonics for establishing the epact and golden number, Woodley does not mention the Carolingian equivalents, which were sung (see Wolfgang Irtenkauf, "Der Computus ecclesiasticus," Archiv fur Musikwissenschaft, 14 [1957]: 1-15).
Two thousand years ago the author of Ecclesiasticus wrote: "Honor a physician with the honor due him for the uses you may have of him, for the Lord hath created him For the Most High cometh healing.
The Vatican recently insisted that it does not have "any relationship" with Frankel's confidant, Father Peter Jacobs, a colorful New York priest, and has also disavowed any connection to the two foundations, Monitor Ecclesiasticus and Saint Francis of Assisi, at the heart of the scam.
The church was valued at pounds 4 in the Taxatio Ecclesiasticus of Pope Nicholas IV in 1291.
The outpouring of accolades for Chairman Murtha over the past week and in the thousands of people who have arrived here to pay their respects to him bring to mind the passage from the Ecclesiasticus honoring the heroes of the Old Testament: 'Now let us praise great men, the heroes of our Nation's history.
In chapter 6 Perdue locates Ben Sira's book, Ecclesiasticus, under the Seleucids.
Another verse from Ecclesiasticus (31:31) advising against 'rebuking thy neighbour at the wine' is offered as a caution.
These words, and other refrains in this paean, come from selected lines in the Old Testament book of Ecclesiasticus, chapters 44-50.
In chapter five, Newman turns to a goddess of ancient authority: the personified Wisdom of the Bible whose medieval identities were based on three Old Testament and Apocryphal books--Proverbs, Ecclesiasticus, and the Wisdom of Solomon--and New Testament interpretations of this divine Sophia.
While the shepherds sound very much like priests--parallels are heard in Gyb's paraphrase of Ecclesiasticus, Horne's sermonlike monologue, and Slowpase's moralizing--they engage in such nonsense and folly as to convince even the most skeptical that, indeed, they are also fools.
She turned to Sirach, author of Ecclesiasticus, for his insight: "The glory of the Lord fills all his works.